Tag Archives: Customer insights

Leading CX Transformation: How to Drive Customer-Centricity

Photo: Frederic Edwin Church – Aurora Borealis – Google Art Project. From Wikimedia Commons.

“It takes a thousand voices to tell a single story.” – Native American proverb

What is a customer-centric organization? According to Janet LeBlanc, President, Janet LeBlanc & Associates Inc., customer-centric organizations:
- Aggressively seek to understand the customer
- Have leaders who meet with employees and customers constantly

During last month’s Total CX Leaders Conference, Janet described how organizations can drive a customer-centric culture:

1. Strategic alignment: Clearly communicate a shared vision of the ideal customer experience. Measure the impact of customer experience initiatives on business performance. Hire customer-focused executives.

2. Senior leadership: Act as a role model for customer-centric behaviors. Regularly showcase examples of customer-centric behaviors by employees. Spend time interacting directly with customers.

3. Customer insights: Quickly identify and resolve trouble spots in the customer experience. Use customer feedback to improve customer communication. Gather customer feedback, in real time, to identify early signs of customer defection.

4. Employee engagement: Clearly define what employees need to do differently to improve the customer experience. Give employees the authority to resolve customer issues on the spot. Provide employees with the right information to address customer issues.

5. Measurements and rewards: Use rewards, other than monetary, to reinforce customer-centric behaviors. Track the effectiveness of customer experience action plans and initiatives. Reward and recognize the achievement of customer experience improvements.

Let’s keep the Total CX Leaders Conference conversations going! Stay connected with TCXL15 at:
- twitter.com/#TCXL15
- linkedin.com/Total Customer Experience Leaders
- facebook.com/Total Customer Experience Leaders

Peggy L. Bieniek, ABC is an Accredited Business Communicator specializing in corporate communication best practices. Connect with Peggy on LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+, and on her website at www.starrybluebrilliance.com.

Primary Research. Personal Legends. Talking Sticks.

Businesses, organizations, and non-profits grow with the
level of first-hand experiences they have with their prospects,
customers, members, or donors. These entities both know themselves and
also know their audience, their tribe.

This is the Relationship Age ‘ the era of paying attention. Think of it as winning business by paying respect.

To know yourself you have to go through a detailed strategic process
and carefully, consciously create a vibrant culture. To know your
audience, you have to learn to respect people deeply. The primacy of
compassionate and sensitive primary, first-hand, narrative research is
the key that unlocks this world of possibilities.

The hardest thing for organizations to do to accomplish such growth
is to realize that traditional marketing research and segmentation is
outmoded. The reason: it looks at the people with whom it should be
trying to cultivate a relationship as a target, a one-dimensional
object, rather than a fully alive human subject with a treasure trove of
stories, memories, dreams, hopes, and fears. In summary, the old method
edits out the humanity. And, winning the innovation game is about
touching humanity, creating something of value for real people.

When the author of The Alchemist and other books, Paulo
Coelho, was inducted into the Brazilian Academy of Letters, he said,
‘The glory of the world is transitory, and we should not measure our
lives by it, but by the choice we make to follow our personal legend, to
believe in our utopias, and to fight for our dreams.’ And then he
wrote, ‘We are all protagonists of our own lives, and it is often the
anonymous heroes who make the deepest mark.’

By honoring people in this spirit, primary research gets to the heart
of the matter’the human experience with a product, service, or
organization’and taps into the personal legends of each of the people
with whom they are working.

Most of the people working in this field are consumer anthropologists
who have been trained to listen respectfully, probe deeply, and stay
attuned for verbal and non-verbal clues. This tradition goes back to
pre-history days in the legend of the Taking Stick. The Talking Stick
was a method used by Native Americans, to let everyone speak their mind
during a council meeting, a type of tribal meeting. According to the
indigenous Americans’ tradition, the stick was imbued with spiritual
qualities that called up the spirit of their ancestors to guide them in
making good decisions. The stick ensured that all members who wished to
speak had their ideas heard. All members of the circle were valued
equally.

The rules of the Talking Stick follow: Whoever holds the talking
stick has within their hands the power of words. Only they can speak
while holding the stick, and the other council members must remain
silent. The eagle feather tied to the stick gives the speaker the
courage and wisdom to speak truthfully and wisely. The rabbit fur on the
end of the stick reminds him that his words must come from his heart.

The history of AA (Alcoholic Anonymous) and other step programs and
the practice of psychotherapy are all based on this awareness: that
speaking the truth is healing. But it is healing for the group as a
whole because as each individual listens, in silence and reverence, a
whole world of understanding opens up.

This world of understanding becomes the basis of innovations that
make lives better and makes organizations more meaningful and
significant.

Michael Graber is the founder and managing partner of the Southern Growth Studio. His book on insights and innovation is forthcoming. Michael also serves as the Region Editor of Innovation Excellence and as a founder and mentor at the Memphis Innovation Bootcamp and Atlanta Innovation Bootcamp. He’ll serve as an offical blogger at TMRE.

Recap: The Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014

Imagine a line drawn in the sand that is filled with hot
burning coals. To the left of the burning line stands
a group of people. And to the right of the burning line stands another group of people. The
group of people on the left are all directly facing the burning line drawn in the
sand and are staring at the opposing group. The group on the right are also all facing
the burning line drawn in the sand, staring directly at the group on the left.
The burning line drawn in the sand represents trust. The
group of people on the left believe they are entitled to the right group’s
trust because they are trying to help them. The group on the right believes
trust is earned and will not easily give it to the group on the left. The tug of
war between the two groups over trust causes friction and creates the burning
line drawn in the sand that neither can cross without the right tools.
The above scenario is analogous to what was presented at the
recent 2014 Future of Consumer Intelligence conference (#FOCI14). The group to the left was Big Business, the group to the right was the Public and we as
attendees were willing and able to sit right on the burning line drawn in the sand and
discuss how to bridge the gap between groups.

BIG DATA VS. BIG PRIVACY

As marketers and researchers we love to collect lots of data
with the intention of using personal information to improve products, services,
and lives. But at what point is it considered invasion of privacy? Do consumers
really know how their data is being used, regardless of whatever they agreed
to? At FOCI14 it was made evident that as marketers and researchers, we teeter
on the brink of ‘Empowerment vs. Endagerment’. The path to maintaining the
balance and bridging the gap on the subject of data between Big Business and
the Public was made evident: provide clear, concise rules and guidelines for
how consumer data is used that moves past legality and into the territory of
morality.
MARKETING SCIENCE VS. PEOPLE
Clearly our industry is at a point of disruptive innovation as
new technologies and methodologies allow researchers to get a clearer picture
of consumer insights. But who are behind all of these insights? That’s right,
people. In our industry we label people as consumers, customers, shoppers,
respondents, target markets and more. But remember that behind all of our
studies are people. And sometimes we can act as a barricade between companies,
their brands, and their consumers in an attempt to remain unbiased and objective. So how do we
bridge the gap?
For starters, John Havens, Founder of The H(app)athon Project, suggests we
can begin by switching out the label ‘consumer’ with ‘customer’. Whereas Elizabeth
Merrick, Senior Customer Insights Manager of HSN suggests we consider research
as another touch point of the brand, ‘We should allow customers to contribute
to a brand, not just consume it.’
So it appears the segue between marketing science and people
is essentially personal treatment and recognizing that customers are more than
a data point within a spreadsheet.

From John Havens, The H(app)athon Project
TECHNOLOGY VS. HUMANIZATION OF DATA
The more I thought about it, FOCI14′s tagline of The Convergence of Technology, Marketing
Science & Humanization of Data seemed unintentionally (or perhaps intentionally) dichotomous where both Big Business and the Public were descending upon the line drawn in the sand. So
it goes with technology & humanization.
There is no doubt that technology improves lives at
blistering speeds. Ray Kurzweil, Director of Engineering for Google pointed
out that, ‘Information Technology expands exponentially across time, not
linearly.’ But as we become more technologically advanced, do we lose a piece
of our humanity and our identity?
As we discussed more and more about the subjects of technological advances, psychological
habits, triggers, and touch points at FOCI14, it seemed the key to closing the
gap between technology & humanization of data relied upon engagement. If new
technologies enable to us to engage with customers in a more meaningful way and
people are able to build stronger psychological connections with each other,
then the gap is bridged. If on the other
hand, the research community were to stand disengaged with customers and people, then technology & humanization in
the field will stand diametrically opposed on a bridge that is about to
collapse.
So the real question in all of this is, ‘Has your
organization bridged the line drawn in the sand’?

Tom Krause, VP of Client Services, Gongos Research
“It’s all about people”
Chris Ruby is an award-winning Marketing Research & Consumer Insights Executive with Fortune 500 consulting experience. His niche is the ability to turn complex data into compelling stories that induce a call for action among key decision-makers. His work has been featured by MRA, MRIA, IIR, Norstat Times, Chadwick Martin Bailey & the Optimization Group. Keep up with Chris Ruby by following him on Twitter @ChrisRubyMRX or by reading the Chris Ruby Market Research Blog.

Live From #TMRE13: Fast, Better and Cheaper Multi-National Qualitative

In the world of technology today, we are starting to change
the way we view things. So, what if qualitative research were no longer
constraint by distance, time, language and place? What would happen to your
business?

At TMRE 2013 in Nashville, TN this afternoon Jim Bryson, CEO
of 20/20 discussed how market researchers could deliver more insights, faster,
from anywhere in the world without constraints. ‘Don’t put limits on your world
just because it’s the way it has always been because it’s not anymore,’ he
explained.
When you are doing global research, you spend all of our
time on the plane not really talking to people. Global research in the past has
been incredibly tiring, expensive and difficult. So, what if we conquered
distance?

According to Bryson, the Internet has allowed us to achieve this.
By 2012, the Internet hit critical mass (82 percent) so we could begin to do research
using the Internet. All of the sudden the Internet came along and gave us the
ability to chip away at the problem of distance. For example, chat rooms became
an effective method for research by way of the Internet.
What about time? Time still causes a huge problem when you
want to talk to someone in other time zones. But, Internet forums solved the
time problem since people didn’t have to be there at the same. ‘Now, we can
talk to people across different time zones on their schedule, not our schedule,’
he added.
Additionally, this allowed us to do longitudinal qualitative
research (research over time). If you want to conduct a global project, you can
no matter where they live.
What if we conquered language? Researchers have always had
problems with language, but it is really important in qualitative research. Luckily,
instant translation like Google translate has made this possible. And further,
you can use a human to audit the translation to ensure it’s correct.
Lastly, what if we conquered place? You can mobile to talk
to respondents anywhere in the world. They can show you and ask questions about
all from their mobile phone.
‘You are with them without actually being there,’ explained
Bryson. ‘We are eradicating the need for distance, time, language, and place.’

About the
Author:  Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and
print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing,
and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs
including Next Big DesignCustomers 1st, and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business
Analysts
. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a
Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the
technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow
her at @AmandaCicc 

Market Research Data Skews Positive in Brazil

As we all know, an integral part of market growth strategy is to make sure that
you know what your customers want, and then to provide them with it – at the
right price, at the right time ‘ through market research. It will guide you in
making strategic business decisions, uncovering unmet customer needs, and help
you discover new ideas for products.

At last year’s TMRE,
Suzana Pamplona Miranda, Director of Strategic Insights and Business
Intelligence at Johnson & Johnson Brazil, sat down with IIR’s Marc Dresner
to discuss the state of market research
in Brazil.
According to Miranda, data from Brazilian respondents tends
to skew positive. ”It’s difficult for a Brazilian to disagree,’ she said. People
in Brazilian society tend to try to be nice, and establish sympathy, so this drastically
impacts their answers when it comes to market research.
There are many ways in which we address that depending on
the way we are running the research. Miranda said that in qualitative it is
very important to pay attention to what is not set. And, in quantitative it is
very important to establish a dialogue.
‘Try to use the consumer language to make them feel
comfortable and feel like they are really chatting with you,’ she explained.
Research is not just about one type of approach ‘ it is
about complimentary types of understanding that when put together, it becomes
part of a comprehensive understanding of the reality.  ‘Our role as researchers is to choose the
right way for that specific problem,’ commented Miranda.

These days, her team at Johnson & Johnson use both
online and offline data for research. Brazil is, in fact, the second largest
country of Facebook users with only 40 percent of Internet penetration in
Brazil currently. 
Check out the full
interview below:

Want to learn more and meet experts just like Miranda in
person? Register for TMRE 2013 today! Click here: http://bit.ly/16zVuM8

Amanda Ciccatelli,
Social Media Strategist at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print
journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and
technology. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web
Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the tech
industry.  She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her
at @AmanadCicc

TMRE 2012 Award Winners Drive Disruptive Innovation

At TMRE 2012 IIR’s Marc
Dresner of Market Research TV sat down with Next Generation Market Research
Disruptive Innovation Award Winners: Steven Cohen, Chris Hart, Melva Benoit, and
Jeff Bander.
The 2012 EXPLOR Award
went to AOL, BBDO and InsightsNow. And, the NGMR Disruptive Innovation Award
winners were broken up into categories including Thought Leadership: FOX
Broadcasting Co. and trueAnthem, Research Concept Deployment: EyeTrackShop, and
Individual Innovator: Steven Cohen, Partner & Co-founder, in4mation
insights.
To Hart, CEO of trueAnthem, the value of earned media is
somewhat overlooked as everyone is in pursuit of word-of-mouth marketing. ‘With
the help of Fox as our partner we are tracking social distribution of content
and measuring the performance of that content. We have identified thousands of
influencers that are key in spreading that earned media awareness across the
social landscape,’ he explained.
Fox decided to partner with trueAnthem because in the social
space, there is no measurement, so Fox wanted to begin the though leadership of
the foundations for measurement and how media should be counted as it’s shared.
 
‘We hope it is the beginning of people having an open
dialogue about how we measure, how we think about it and how we ultimately value
social media,’ said Melva Benoit, Senior VP of Fox Broadcasting.
CEO of trueAnthem Cohen has achieved innovative accomplishments in his career, but
something still continues to bother him. He says, ‘I try to question the
assumptions of what we do in order to say ‘Is there a better way’? I always say
‘Why are we doing it that way? Is there a better way? Can we learn a better
way”?
Bander, president of the Americas and general manager,
EveTrackShop, and his company have a track record of being very disruptive in
the market research world for decades. As the world’s first and only online eye
tracking, it has changed the paradigm of eye tracking because they send links
out to anywhere in the world and can see everything about how a person is using
it.
‘Most people have been guessing what’s seen and not seen
whether it’s print, TV, online video, or websites. Now, companies can simply
show the results. It’s not about what you like, it’s about what is seen,’
commented Bander.
Check out the full
interview below:
Amanda Ciccatelli,
Social Media Strategist at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print
journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and
technology. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web
Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the tech
industry.  She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her
at @AmanadCicc. 

Hallmark’s Innovation Leaders Value Market Researchers for Customer Insights

At last year’s TMRE,
Laurie Monsees, Vice President & Platform Leader, Hallmark, sat down with
IIR’s Marc Dresner to discuss how market researchers help Hallmark reach its customers more
effectively.
When it comes to Hallmark, it’s a best practice in the
industry to have an innovation funnel and pipeline with stage gates in between
so you have lots of ideation in the front of the pipe.  According to Monsees, there is a lot of
iteration at the front and that is where Hallmark’s spends time working with
research.
‘I recently read Tina Fay’s book ‘Bossy Pants’ and it made
me think about how collaboration has a lot to do with comedy, especially
improvisation,’ she explained. ‘In addition, you have to be very open to
everyone else’s ideas and you can’t be set in your idea and wait for the person
to stop talking so you can say your idea – you have to respond to what the
other person says.’
To Monsees, it’s a dance within the room as there is a great
deal of cross functionally at a table, but everyone is throwing ideas around as
innovators.
‘Collaboration is where the juice is for me,’ she
commented.  ‘As someone who has a
background in creative design, writing and editorial, I welcome the ideas of
our research partners because they are objective and have all this consumer
insight floating around in their brains that they are able to pull out at the
right moment so that we are not speaking to ourselves.’
According to Monsees, you must put yourself in the consumer’s
mindset. She took one of Hallmark’s new concepts home to share with her family,
but she soon realized the scale just wasn’t there.
She added, ‘You can’t get that insight without living it
yourself. It keeps you in the real instead of the ideal.’


Check out the full
interview below:

Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the tech industry.  She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmanadCicc. 

Related articles

Reminder: Winning the Brand Share Battle Webinar

With TMRE 2012 behind us, we’d like to remind you that the learning doesn’t end with our annual event. IIR USA and The Market Research Event would like to invite you to participate in our on-going Insights Webinar Series, your resource for insights on the cutting edge.

We’re pleased to present one more upcoming webinar in the 2012 series, Winning the Brand Share Battle Tuesday, December 18, 2012 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM ET

Presented by Kirsten Zapiec, Senior Vice President, TNS

Traditional research methodologies are fundamentally flawed. The industry relies on incomplete models that fail to reflect what people actually do, and fail therefore to give marketers a true understanding of what is happening to their brands ‘ where the growth opportunities lie and when a brand is at risk.

To provide marketers with clear direction for profitable brand growth, research must better reflect how people make decisions. It must acknowledge that human beings are often indecisive, inconsistent and their spending patterns shift constantly for many reasons.

Using real examples from a global TNS study, The Commitment Economy, Kirsten Zapiec, Senior Vice President at TNS, will show you how to identify the biggest growth opportunities for your brand. They will reveal the three main marketing levers that prevent companies from taking advantage of these growth opportunities ‘ and the best ways to deal with each of them.

Register for this webinar here.

This webinar is sponsored by: TNS
TNS advises clients on specific growth strategies around new market entry, innovation, brand switching and stakeholder management, based on long-established expertise and market-leading solutions. With a presence in over 80 countries, TNS has more conversations with the world’s consumers than anyone else and understands individual human behaviors and at titudes across every cultural, economic and political region of the world.

TNS is part of Kantar, one of the world’s largest insight, information and consultancy groups.

All of our Insights web seminars are available after the live event for on-demand learning, view past insights webinars here.

Join our Complimentary Insights Webinar Series

With TMRE 2012 behind us, we’d like to remind you that the learning doesn’t end with our annual event. IIR USA and The Market Research Event would like to invite you to participate in our on-going Insights Webinar Series, your resource for insights on the cutting edge.

Please join us for these upcoming webinars, or view all of our offerings here.

Falling Dow + Rising Tao: What the Quest for Balance Means for Your Brand,
Wednesday, December 5, 2012 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM ET

Presented by Erin Barber, Vice President, C+R Research and Mary McIlrath, Ph.D., Senior Vice President, C+R Research

Register here.

Nowadays, there’s a focus on the Millennial generation and understanding what makes them tick. However, we’ve uncovered what’s relevant and present across all generations, including Millennials. Hard economic times have shifted the way most consumers prioritize the pieces of their lives and the way they select brands to help them walk their chosen path. Balance is not a new concept but cultural changes have forced many to reconsider how they can achieve it. In this research, we delved into multi-generational consumers’ lives to get a holistic understanding of what they’re doing and how they feel about their lives on a daily basis. We uncovered what brands are currently helping them and what your brand could do to help consumers reach their goals.


Understanding the Voice of the Customer: How to Effectively Gather and Leverage Customer Insight from Multiple Channels to Enhance the Customer Experience,
Tuesday, December 11, 2012 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM ET

Presented by Dan Burke, Vice President eBusiness, Autonomy, a HP Company

Register here.

Voice of the Customer is not just about surveys anymore.
Customers are interacting with your brand through multiple channels, including the website, retail store, contact center and even social media. You have to understand all of these multi-channel interactions collectively to develop a complete Voice of the Customer.
Join us during this webinar and learn how you can easily gather and leverage data from all customer touchpoints to deliver a superior multi-channel customer experience.

Winning the Brand Share Battle,
Tuesday, December 18, 2012 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM ET

Presented by Kirsten Zapiec, Senior Vice President, TNS

Register here.

Traditional research methodologies are fundamentally flawed. The industry relies on incomplete models that fail to reflect what people actually do, and fail therefore to give marketers a true understanding of what is happening to their brands ‘ where the growth opportunities lie and when a brand is at risk.
To provide marketers with clear direction for profitable brand growth, research must better reflect how people make decisions. It must acknowledge that human beings are often indecisive, inconsistent and their spending patterns shift constantly for many reasons.
Using real examples from a global TNS study, The Commitment Economy, Kirsten Zapiec, Senior Vice President at TNS, will show you how to identify the biggest growth opportunities for your brand. They will reveal the three main marketing levers that prevent companies from taking advantage of these growth opportunities ‘ and the best ways to deal with each of them

Best,
The TMRE Team

Connect with us:
Twitter: http://twitter.com/tmre
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/marketresearchevent

Going “Beyong Social Media Listening” – Webinar Recording

Recently we were pleased to present a webinar entitled “Driving Best-In-Class Customer Experience: Beyond Social Media Listening” in cooperation with EmPower Research, a Genpact company.

In this session, presenter Sagita Joshi explored customer experience through a social media lens. We learned more about the ways that Twitter “has become the help desk” with examples such as Lenovo and Best Buy’s “Twelpforce” leading the way. Joshi presented a “win me, delight me, keep me” approach to social media customer experience building, with Empower finding that over time increased awareness of a brand on social media lead to up to 37% more first timers visiting a brand’s page. To learn more, view a recording of the webinar here.

Are you using social media for customer experience?

About EmPower Research:
EmPower Research, a Genpact company (NYSE:G) provides integrated media and business research services. We help our clients understand stakeholder perception and needs, empowering them to service better. We use proprietary methodologies to listen and learn about conversations in the customer ecosystem, deriving real insights for active stakeholder engagement.
For more information, visit http://www.empowerresearch.com 

Michelle LeBlanc is a Social Media Strategist at IIR USA with a specialization in marketing. She may be reached at mleblanc@iirusa.com