Tag Archives: consumer intelligence

Recap: The Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014

Imagine a line drawn in the sand that is filled with hot burning coals. To the left of the burning line stands a group of people. And to the right of the burning line stands another group of people. The group of people on the left are all directly facing the burning line drawn in the sand and are staring at the opposing group. The group on the right are also all facing the burning line drawn in the sand, staring directly at the group on the left.
The burning line drawn in the sand represents trust. The group of people on the left believe they are entitled to the right group’s trust because they are trying to help them. The group on the right believes trust is earned and will not easily give it to the group on the left. The tug of war between the two groups over trust causes friction and creates the burning line drawn in the sand that neither can cross without the right tools.
The above scenario is analogous to what was presented at the recent 2014 Future of Consumer Intelligence conference (#FOCI14). The group to the left was Big Business, the group to the right was the Public and we as attendees were willing and able to sit right on the burning line drawn in the sand and discuss how to bridge the gap between groups.
BIG DATA VS. BIG PRIVACY

As marketers and researchers we love to collect lots of data with the intention of using personal information to improve products, services, and lives. But at what point is it considered invasion of privacy? Do consumers really know how their data is being used, regardless of whatever they agreed to? At FOCI14 it was made evident that as marketers and researchers, we teeter on the brink of ‘Empowerment vs. Endagerment’. The path to maintaining the balance and bridging the gap on the subject of data between Big Business and the Public was made evident: provide clear, concise rules and guidelines for how consumer data is used that moves past legality and into the territory of morality.
MARKETING SCIENCE VS. PEOPLE

Clearly our industry is at a point of disruptive innovation as new technologies and methodologies allow researchers to get a clearer picture of consumer insights. But who are behind all of these insights? That’s right, people. In our industry we label people as consumers, customers, shoppers, respondents, target markets and more. But remember that behind all of our studies are people. And sometimes we can act as a barricade between companies, their brands, and their consumers in an attempt to remain unbiased and objective. So how do we bridge the gap?
For starters, John Havens, Founder of The H(app)athon Project, suggests we can begin by switching out the label ‘consumer’ with ‘customer’. Whereas Elizabeth Merrick, Senior Customer Insights Manager of HSN suggests we consider research as another touch point of the brand, ‘We should allow customers to contribute to a brand, not just consume it.’
So it appears the segue between marketing science and people is essentially personal treatment and recognizing that customers are more than a data point within a spreadsheet.
TECHNOLOGY VS. HUMANIZATION OF DATA

The more I thought about it, FOCI14′s tagline of The Convergence of Technology, Marketing Science & Humanization of Data seemed unintentionally (or perhaps intentionally) dichotomous where both Big Business and the Public were descending upon the line drawn in the sand. So it goes with technology & humanization.
There is no doubt that technology improves lives at blistering speeds. Ray Kurzweil, Director of Engineering for Google pointed out that, ‘Information Technology expands exponentially across time, not linearly.’ But as we become more technologically advanced, do we lose a piece of our humanity and our identity?
As we discussed more and more about the subjects of technological advances, psychological habits, triggers, and touch points at FOCI14, it seemed the key to closing the gap between technology & humanization of data relied upon engagement. If new technologies enable to us to engage with customers in a more 
meaningful way and people are able to build stronger psychological connections with each other, then the gap is bridged. If on the other hand, the research community were to stand disengaged with customers and people, then technology & humanization in the field will stand diametrically opposed on a bridge that is about to collapse.
So the real question in all of this is, ‘Has your organization bridged the line drawn in the sand’?
Editors Note: This post was written by MrChrisRuby, an award-winning expert Marketing Research & Consumer Insights Executive who has consulted with several Fortune 500 companies. He is passionate about morphing data into actionable marketing intelligence that augments business operations. Follow MrChrisRuby on Twitter @MrChrisRuby, email him at mrchrisruby@gmail.com or read The Market Research Insider blog.

Top 8 Takeaways on Privacy

One of the overlying themes of this year’s Future of
Consumer Intelligence conference is consumer privacy and the concept of
“Empowerment vs. Endangerment” as it relates to the handling and
usage of data. As researchers, we collect , analyze and utilize consumers’
information to improve products, services and the customer experience.
But really, the true question posed in all of this is,
“Where do we draw the line in privacy practices?”  Regardless of
whatever privacy policies consumers have agreed to (without actually reading
the pages and pages of fine print) they still expect companies to act
responsibility with their digital imprint. 
So here are the top 8 takeaways from today’s discussions
about consumer privacy:

1. Businesses typically dictate terms of privacy for consumers.
However, consumers should have the right to 
dictate their own terms and
conditions of privacy to businesses because it is their identify
2. We need need to move past the legality of consumer privacy
and responsibly consider the morality of consumer privacy within our agreements
3. Clarity is essential and needs to be installed within data
collection and data mining privacy guidelines and not be hidden in fine print
4. Consumer trust will increase as better practice guidelines
are built into frameworks and agreements
5. Location privacy is a fundamental part of who we are as our
location reveals our tastes, preferences and identities
6. Privacy equals control and consumers should control their
data and have freedom of choice as to how, where and when it is used
7. Privacy by design should be built into our studies and
framework. Yes it costs $$. But preventing a breach will save you even more $$

8. Embed privacy by design into initial frameworks because they
are harder to change down the line
 
MrChrisRuby is
an award-winning expert Marketing Research & Consumer Insights Executive
who has consulted with several Fortune 500 companies. He is passionate about
augmenting product development, the customer experience & corporate
revenue. Follow MrChrisRuby on Twitter @MrChrisRuby,
email him at mrchrisruby@gmail.com or
read The Market
Research Insider
 blog.

Hacking H(app)inesss by John Havens

Editor’s Note: This post
is written by Annie Pettit, PhD, the Chief Research Officer at Peanut Labs,
a company specializing in self-serve panel sample.

OPENING MORNING
KEYNOTE
Hacking H(app)iness ‘ How to Give Big Data a Direction 

John Havens, Founder, THE H(APP)ATHON PROJECT,
Author, HACKING H(APP)INESS- WHY YOUR PERSONAL DATA COUNTS AND HOW
TRACKING IT CAN CHANGE THE WORLD
  • What are YOU worth? What are WE worth? Money? Home life,
    family
  • I think therefore I am’ I sync therefore I am ‘ our identity
    is our data
  • It’s more than being on facebook. Lots of people are on
    facebook via photos and references even though they have never touched
    facebook.
  • Lots of things happen without seeing them ‘ sound waves,
    stress ‘ but can be quantified regardless ‘ facial recognition technology, MRIs
  • You can wear a device that measures your health or diet or
    fitness. Allows you to collect a lot of data without deciding exactly what you
    want to measure.
  • what is a data broker?  [i have no idea]
  • privacy should be considered as control, privacy is
    personal. do i have the right to see copies of data collected on me
  • the property that you collected, the data that you gathered,
    that’s ME.
  • get people to trust your use of their data and they will
    share more with you
  • people who are happier need less medication
  • hedonic happiness goes up and down as good and bad things
    happen; unomonic happiness is intrinsic well-being such as altruism which makes
    you feel like you have purpose
  • you can be choiceful about what you allow into your brain ‘
    you CAN turn off the 11 pm news, tell yourself 3 three you are happy about
  • ‘Do you want to go consume a movie’?   ‘Do you want to
    consume a barbie doll’?  This is not how people communicate with each
    other
  • Would you wear every wearable device if someone gave you $20
    000? Only if you trust them [yeah, not happening for me!]
  • People think the word consumer is impersonal, commoditized,
    transactional, negative. Why do we keep on using this word?
  • Consumers WANT to be called guest, shopper, friend, client,
    valued, customer, person, partner, patron
  • Stop calling them consumers. the paradigm won’t change. the
    relationship won’t change.  [I've switched. I call people people now.]
  • What are you worth? Not money.

World Cup Advertising Wars: How to Compete with the Big Guys

Editor’s Note: This
blog post is brought to you by Mattr, a
company that is leading a new era for consumer insights, providing brands with
a deeper, more colorful view into their social audience. Through a unique mix
of personality data and demographics, Marketers can begin to discover what
really makes their audience tick.

The World Cup hype has officially started!  And if
you’re in Marketing/ Advertising, you’re probably keeping a close eye on the
various campaigns that have been introduced to pay homage to one of the world’s
most watched sporting events.
Some of the first to release their campaigns were the big
soda brands.  World Cup sponsor Coca-Cola and competitor Pepsi have both
recently launched TV spots, and there’s already lots of chatter on who got it
right
.  That answer might seem subjective to most.  But as
Marketers know, putting together a campaign that speaks to the right audience
takes more than luck.  It takes planning and strategy.  It takes
understanding of various brand segments and how to reach them on a personal
level.  And it takes knowing that powerful stories about the people behind
a brand reside in unfiltered data.
That being said, it can be assumed that both Coca-Cola and
Pepsi did lots of research for their campaigns, utilizing large budgets and
plenty of time to plan (Coca-Cola apparently began planning back
in 2012, and World Cup 2014 stands as their largest campaign ever!).
But for those agencies that might not have the dollars or
time to spend on such intensive research- there are simple ways to accomplish a
similar goal of understanding audiences by looking at some easily accessible
data.  We’ll show you how.  And we’ll also come to our own
conclusion, based on our own data, on which soda brand might have the slight
advantage in the World Cup campaign wars.
Social- The Secret
Sauce

Social has become a very viable option when it comes to
gathering insights about your audience.  It’s as easy as picking a social
segmentation tool and diving in to all of the data.

We’ve started our own segmentation analysis with a
historical snapshot of the FIFA audience, or the last 500 people who have
engaged with @FIFAWorldCup on Twitter.   That breakdown shows the
highest engagement came from ‘Wholesome Males’, as seen below:
‘Wholesome’ indicates personality traits like down-to-earth,
honest, family oriented, sincere, real and sentimental.  A ‘Wholesome’
person might respond best to campaigns based on truth, openness and emotion
(more about ‘Personality Identification’ through social can be found here- very
interesting stuff!).
Hot on the trails of those ‘Wholesome’ males are ‘Rugged’
males, with their own set of unique traits that gets them excited.  It’s
advantageous for Marketers to look into both groups to see what makes each of
them tick.
Hash Out the Hashtags

Now take the analysis a step further, and look at the
‘real-time’ breakdown of the FIFA audience.  In addition to those folks
who are currently engaging with the @FIFAWorldCup Twitter handle, you might
also be interested in the people who are using the top three most popular
Twitter hashtags for the World Cup in general (which are #WorldCup, #Brazil, and
#WorldCup2014).  The new analysis looks like this:
Not surprisingly, the @FIFAWorldCup audience and those using
the most popular World Cup hashtags look very similar.  Looking ahead, a
Marketer can be confident that the ‘Wholesome’ and ‘Rugged’ males should be the
right audience to go after for a campaign.
Your Own Hashtags-
Who’s Engaging?

Last, if you’ve created and launched campaign hashtags, it
might be beneficial to analyze the people who are chiming in with those
hashtags on social, as long as there’s some good traction.  Today, both
Coke and Pepsi have launched hashtags for their World Cup campaigns (#WorldsCup
and #LiveForNow, respectively).  Traction was highest during the release
of the campaigns, and has now subsided.
However, as engagement with these hashtags increases again,
which should be a top goal for both brands, Marketers can analyze what types of
people the online campaigns are attracting and figure out ways to target those
audiences better.  We’ve started a new analysis on Coke’s hashtag
engagement moving forward, and will report back in an upcoming blog.
So what does all of this tell you about launching your own
World Cup (or any other) campaign? The point is that social data matters, and
so do the people behind that data.  If you can dig into that data enough
to understand your audience on a very deep and personal level, then you’ve
automatically pushed ahead of your competition when it comes to planning the
tone and messages within your various campaigns.
Who Wins the Soda
War?

The Coca-Cola campaign plays to inclusiveness, youth,
uniqueness, togetherness, grandiosity and social good (think
‘Wholesome’).  The Pepsi campaign plays towards celebrity, playfulness,
music, creativity, art and fun (think ‘Sophisticated’ or ‘Daring’). 
According to our analysis of the FIFA audience, our vote goes to Coke.
 But hats off to both campaigns!
Next week we’ll take a look at changes to the @FIFAWorldCup
Personas as engagement increases, which might cause Marketers to tweak their
real-time campaigns.  And we’ll compare two new ‘Big Brand’ campaigns that
have staked their claim on the World Cup turf.
Want to start your own segmentation and hashtag analysis?
Click here.
Mattr is a sponsor of
The Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014
taking place next week in Los Angeles, CA. This year, FOCI explores the
emerging role of decision science and the convergence of knowledge points -
insights, foresights, social science, marketing science and intelligence with
technology as a central driving force and profound connector.

As a reader of our
blog, you get an exclusive 15% discount on your FOCI 2014 pass. Use
code FOCI14BLOG when you register: http://bit.ly/RRvQzl

The American Cancer Society’s Kimberly Cason On the Future of Research

I recently sat down with The Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014 speaker Kimberly Cason, Senior Consultant, Marketing Research, American Cancer Society, Inc. We are fortunate to have her share her critical insight with our FOCI community before the event kicks off in two weeks. This year, FOCI explores the emerging role of decision science and the convergence of knowledge points – insights, foresights, social science, marketing science and intelligence with technology as a central driving force and profound connector.
We are barraged by information – and within this sea of data we must remember to think of the problem we are trying to solve and how we can we use this convergence of information to better understand people.  Translating the new “understanding” into future opportunities means that the role of a researcher is changing. FOCI accelerates disruptive innovators in the research space and pushes people to take risks, to think outside of traditional research methods and insights gathering and explore new and alternative tools and technologies. FOCI will bridge the gap between what people say they are going to do and what they actually do.
Here is what Cason had to say:
IIR: A big theme of this year’s conference is ‘humanization of data.’ Why do you think understanding PEOPLE (not consumers) presents an opportunity for strategic action?
Cason: Marketing has moved to a custom-level. When you walk into the Nike store, you get greeted by name and they know how many steps you’ve taken that day (if you are a user of their gear).  We have to move with it or risk putting ourselves into extension by not providing relevant insights.
IIR: How is technology not only changing how we do things, but also how we understand the world, business, and people?
Cason: Technology is so engrained in our lifestyles that not only our purchasing behavior is deeply impacted by it, but also our personal lives ‘ how we communicate with family and friends, even.  How we integrate (or choose not to integrate) technology into our lives defines us internally and externally, shaping our own personal brands.  Even where we choose to engage defines us. 
IIR: How has the role of ‘the researcher’ changed?
Cason: There is an entirely new set of skills required to manage the holistic picture.  I’ve become versed in Google Analytics, for example.  There are entire semesters of information I’ve had to learn as the field evolves.  Social media wasn’t even on our radar when I was in grad school (in 2005).
IIR: Describe a situation where you’ve taken a risk or thought outside the box of tradition market research methods. How did that benefit your business?
Cason: I love the quasi qual/quant methodology that allows you to gather large amounts of qualitative data using survey tools.  (Hot Spot message testing, for example.)  These methods allow us to collect the data in one week compared to 6 if we used a traditional focus group recruiting and interview strategy.  Both have their advantages and disadvantages, of course, but these methods allow for a disaster check when time isn’t on your side.
IIR: Where do you see the emerging space of marketing science and role of data scientists in the next five years?
Cason: We have always been story tellers.  Now, we have to tell the story not only from the driver’s seat of the car we’re in, but within the context of the entire freeway ‘ all the other variables that come into play’is there traffic, what’s the weather like, are other drivers distracted, how reliable is the car, how far to the next exit, etc.?  It’s no longer useful to bring one methodology to the table when presenting the whys behind our results.  We have to look at all the influential factors and determine which are relevant.
IIR: How has the increasingly connected consumer affected market research?
Cason: It’s a huge opportunity for us!  Those that can turn down the noise and find the nuggets of meaningful data will go far.
Want to hear more from Kimberly in person? Join her at Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014 in Los Angeles, CA in a few weeks. She will be presenting in a session entitled, ‘Award-Winning, Top-Tier Research on a Budget!’ 
** As a reader of our blog, you get an exclusive 15% discount on your FOCI 2014 pass. Use code FOCI14BLOG when you register: http://bit.ly/1mvqyD0**
About the Author: Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs including Next Big DesignCustomers 1st, and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business Analysts, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc.

Speaker Spotlight: Greg Heist

I recently sat down with The
Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014
keynote speaker Greg Heist, Vice President,
Strategy & Innovation, Gongos Inc., who discussed how the role of ‘the
researcher’ has changed as well as how the increasingly connected customer has
affected market research, among much more.  
We are fortunate to have him share his critical insight with
our FOCI community. This year, FOCI explores the emerging role of
decision science and the convergence of knowledge points – insights,
foresights, social science, marketing science and intelligence with technology
as a central driving force and profound connector.
We are barraged by information – and within this sea of data
we must remember to think of the problem we are trying to solve and how we can
we use this convergence of information to better understand people.
 Translating the new “understanding” into future opportunities
means that the role of a researcher is changing. FOCI accelerates disruptive
innovators in the research space and pushes people to take risks, to think
outside of traditional research methods and insights gathering and explore new
and alternative tools and technologies. FOCI will bridge the gap between what
people say they are going to do and what they actually do.
Here is what Heist had to say:
IIR: How has the
role of ‘the researcher’ changed?
Heist: Great
question.  In many ways, the bar continues to be raised with regard to
what executives expect of researchers. In particular, research professionals
are being challenged to provide greater context to insights by triangulating
them with past learnings.  Simultaneously, they’re being asked to find new
ways to bring insights to life in a clear and compelling way.  All of
these are broadening the role of ‘the researcher’ from being an objective
reporter of results to a strategic catalyst of deeper meaning. 
IIR: Where do you
see the emerging space of marketing science and role of data scientists in the
next five years?
Heist: It’s
difficult to overstate the importance of data science and how it will fuse with
what we think of today as ‘marketing sciences.’ The incredible abundance of
data flowing into corporations that is not primary market research data is
mind-numbing.  As a result, organizations instinctively know there are
significant consumer insights to be unlocked within these enormous and
disparate data sets. Traditional marketing sciences techniques are, in
most cases, inadequate to meet this new challenge.  As a result, we will
continue to see greater reliance on data scientists (and the innovative use of
applied mathematics) to unpack these insights and extract new value.  At
Gongos, we are so convinced of the significance of this trend that we launched
a decision sciences business unit, O2 Integrated, at the start of 2013. 
We’ve already seen the ways O2 talent is engrained with clients to help solve
some of their most complex business challenges using highly advanced
approaches.
IIR: How has the
increasingly connected consumer affected market research?
Heist: We’ve only
seen the tip of the iceberg in terms of how the ‘connected consumer’ will
affect market research.  Right now, we’re seeing tremendous investment in
mobile technologies on the agency side, with much slower adoption of mobile
methods by clients, particularly in the quant realm.  At the same time,
there is an uptick in mobile qual methods since they provide a level of immediacy
and authenticity that traditional online methods can’t match.  In the
future, I believe we are going to see greater adoption and integration of
location-based, behavioral and biometric data streams into consumer research,
with new kinds of insights emerging as a result.
IIR: Tell us a
little bit about your upcoming presentation taking place at The Future of
Consumer Intelligence 2014 entitled, ‘Reinvent & Realign: The Insights
Organization Reimagined.’ What can we expect from it?
Heist: As
insights professionals, we live in very exciting times. We’re emerging
from a relatively stable, collective understanding of what ‘market research’ is
and how it’s perceived within corporations.  The currents of change (some
of which I referred to above) felt across our discipline are significant.
 So significant, that the traditional MR business model and skillsets are
not going to be sufficient to meet the challenge before us.  Our
presentation will provide glimpses into how to reimagine the role, structure
and competencies of the Insights Organization.  Using video-based examples
from clients, we hope to provide the audience with a foreseeable vision of the
future.  My co-presenter Tom Krause, who spent 16 years collectively at
Advance Auto Parts, Best Buy and Pillsbury, is also incredibly passionate about
this topic and we look forward to sharing this vision with FOCI attendees.
Want to hear more from Greg in person? Join him
at Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014 in Los Angeles, CA in May.
He will be presenting a keynote entitled, ‘Reinvent & Realign: The
Insights Organization Reimagined.’ To
learn more about the event and register, click here:  http://bit.ly/QUSg1I
** As a reader of our
blog, you get an exclusive 15% discount on your FOCI 2014 pass. Use
code FOCI14BLOG when you register **

About the Author:
Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and
print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing,
and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs
including Next Big DesignCustomers 1st, and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business
Analysts
, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,.
She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where
she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She
can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc.

A Look at The Future of Consumer Intelligence

Understanding people (not consumers) across numerous platforms in an increasingly interconnected world mixed with always-on technology, presents an opportunity for you to know people more deeply and take strategic action. Technology is the central driving force amongst the foremost mega and macro trends across industries. In fact, it is advancing at such a fast pace that it is changing how we do things, how we understand the world, business, and even people.
This year, The Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014 explores the emerging role of decision science and the convergence of knowledge points – insights, foresights, social science, marketing science and intelligence with technology a central driving force and profound connector. This cutting-edge event accelerates disruptive thinking around decision science. This unique aggregation of diversity across insights, data science, marketing science, social science with technology as a common thread provokes new questions and explores new futures.
This event accelerates disruptive innovators in the research space and pushes people to take risks, to think outside of traditional research methods and explore new, alternative tools and technologies. You will see in May that FOCI will bridge the gap for you between what people say they are going to do and what they actually do.

For a look at what to expect at FOCI in a few weeks, watch the short video below:

For more information on the event, click here to download the interactive brochure: http://bit.ly/1poyewr
You get an exclusive 15% discount for being a valued reader of our blog. So use your special discount code FOCI14BLOG when you register: http://bit.ly/1rfDFuV

See you in sunny California!

Privacy Engineering: What Researchers Need to Know

McAfee
Chief Privacy Officer Urges Insights Pros to Own Privacy and Big Data





By Marc Dresner, IIR

‘The fantastic advances in the field of electronic communication
constitute a greater danger to the privacy of the individual.’ 
‘ Earl Warren, 14th Chief
Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, died 1974
‘Privacy is dead, and social media hold the
smoking gun.’ 
‘ Pete Cashmore, Founder and CEO of Mashable, born 1985
The fellas quoted above
were, I believe, referring to opposing sides of the privacy coin: The former
was talking about government surveillance of the Orwellian sort; the latter’taken
from a 2009 blog post’spoke to people’s increasing compulsion to publicize their
personal lives.
To distinguish between the
two assumes there is a line that can be crossed, aka ‘informed consent.’
Privacy advocates have
argued that informed consent is more or less a fallacy because the information
needed to make a fully informed choice is largely inaccessible
But privacy advocates’including
top security and legal experts’have argued that informed consent is more or
less a fallacy, because the information needed to make a fully informed choice
is largely inaccessible to the
average person.
That’s ‘inaccessible’ in three
broad categories:
1.   
Inaccessible by design‘for legit* purposes
(national security or law enforcement) and also for ethically questionable purposes
(ex. Facebook’s privacy gaffes and antics).
*Sorry, but I’ll not kick the Edward
Snowden beehive in this forum today.


2.   
Inadvertently inaccessible, but fixable‘Ex. privacy
policies that can only be deciphered by lawyers or that will only be read by
very patient, unusually suspicious people with lots of time on their hands.
3.   
Inadvertently inaccessible, but unavoidable‘the
complex tangle of partnerships, affiliations, agreements and policy overlaps,
oversights, contradictions, accidents, etc., that comprise our digital universe
(it is called the Web, after all) make it practically impossible for someone to
be completely informed of all the ways information about them may be or is
being used.
The jury appears to be
out when it comes to the ownership and control of all of those digital data
points we generate
I’ll leave it to the
intelligentsia (not used in the pejorative here) to debate whether or not we’re
doomed to life in a digital panopticon, but the jury appears to be indefinitely
out when it comes to the ownership and control of all of those data points we’re
generating in the digital realm.
This much is clear: The
privacy debate isn’t going anywhere; it’s just getting started.
People seem resigned
to the fact that information about them is collected and used for purposes they
aren’t aware of and might not consent to if they were
For the time being, people
seem generally resigned to and even comfortable with the fact that information
about them is being collected by unknown others and used in all kinds of ways
for all sorts of purposes that we aren’t aware of and might not consent to if
we were.
But for how long? It seems a
tenuous peace at best.
I’ve attended sessions at
two of FoCI’s sister events within the past six months’Foresight & Trends
and Media Insights & Engagement, respectively’whose speakers warned their
audiences that the sleeping giant is stirring.
All of this
matters to insights jocks more than one might suppose.
Consumer researchers work hard to build and
maintain respondents’ trust, and I think most would agree that there’s no
privacy bugaboo in taking surveys, participating on panels, etc.
But even if transparent,
double opt-in instruments are still the primary source of consumer intelligence’debatable’they’re
certainly not the only source.
We have Big Data now, pulled
from across the digital universe. The sheer breadth of sources without a doubt increases
the likelihood that we’ve violated someone’s privacy.
As consumer insights become
increasingly dependent upon and intertwined with technology, we find ourselves
in a precarious position
So as the consumer
intelligence field becomes increasingly dependent upon and intertwined with technology,
we find ourselves in an increasingly precarious position because we cannot be
guaranteed that the data we’re collecting and analyzing was captured with
informed consent.
Moreover, research
professionals cast in the traditional mold aren’t the only ones accessing and
using these data. We’re not necessarily the gatekeepers and we can’t always
know which information from even our own internal databases is being used, how
and by whom.
That is the domain of the
chief privacy officer, or in lieu of a CPO, typically a mishmash of IT and
legal folks.
Michelle Dennedy
Enter Michelle Dennedy, VP and Chief Privacy Officer at McAfee,
and co-author of ‘The Privacy Engineer’s Manifesto: Getting from Policy to Code
to QA to Value.’
Dennedy is a top authority whose credentials straddle the legal and
technological aspects of data security and privacy.
She and co-authors Jonathon
Fox and Thomas Finneran have developed a new model: ‘privacy
engineering,’ which endeavors to operationalize privacy and embed it in the products and processes companies use, buy, create and
sell. 
‘Privacy engineering is a way to build respect for information about
people back into our infrastructure and to think about data from the consumer
perspective’
‘Privacy
engineering is a way to build respect for information about people back into
our infrastructure and to think about data from the consumer perspective,’
Dennedy told The Research Insighter.
This
is particularly important to the Future of Consumer Intelligence audience
because companies are increasingly looking outside the
research function to data scientists to manage Big Data.
The
approach outlined in ‘The Privacy Engineer’s Manifesto’ appears to offer a blueprint consumer researchers can
use to insinuate themselves in the fundamental discussions that shape not only
privacy policy and practice, but the manner and extent to which companies
harness Big Data moving forward.
(Full disclosure: I have not yet read the book, but I’ve researched it thoroughly and rest assured you don’t need to be an IT specialist to understand it.) 
‘At
best, most companies probably leverage maybe 1-2% of the true import of data
through analytics that count,’ noted Dennedy.
‘A lot of Big Data analytics are wrong because they fail to address the
true business problem, a human problem.’
‘I
think a lot of these Big Data analytics are wrong or bad,’ she added, ‘because
they fail to address the true business problem, and by that I mean a human
problem.’
‘Researchers tend to
understand the business case and how data should be leveraged,’ she observed.
According to Dennedy, it’s
time for researchers to step up and reach out to their counterparts in
functions they may not normally work with, even if it means taking on projects
outside their current purview.
‘Consumer
and marketing researchers become quintessentially important when they carry
insights across the aisle,’ Dennedy said.
‘Make
sure those customer insights and pain points are part of the equation from the
start.’
In
this podcast for The Research Insighter’the official interview series of the
Future of Consumer Intelligence (FoCI) conference’Dennedy discusses:

‘ ‘Privacy engineering”what it is and why it
matters

‘ The problem with Big Data

‘ Applications and implications for large and small
companies, alike

‘ What researchers can do today to get involved, and
more!

Editor’s note: Michelle Dennedy will present ‘The
Privacy Manifesto’ at The Future of Consumer Intelligence Conference taking place May 19-21 in Universal City,
California.
SAVE 15% on your registration to attend The Future of
Consumer Intelligence when you use code FOCI14BLOG. 

Register here today!

For more information, please visit www.futureofconsumerintel.com

  


ABOUT THE AUTHOR / INTERVIEWER 
Marc Dresner is IIR USA’s sr. editor and special communication project lead. He is the former executive editor of Research Business Report, a confidential newsletter for the marketing research and consumer insights industry. He may be reached at mdresner@iirusa.com. Follow him @mdrezz.

Technology is Changing How We Understand the World

I recently sat down with Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014 keynote speaker Magnus Lindkvist, Trendspotter & Futurologist, who discussed how technology is not only changing how we do things, but also how we understand the world, business, and people as well as the emerging space of marketing science.
We are fortunate to have her share her critical insight with our FOCI community. This year, FOCIexplores the emerging role of decision science and the convergence of knowledge points – insights, foresights, social science, marketing science and intelligence with technology as a central driving force and profound connector.
We are barraged by information – and within this sea of data we must remember to think of the problem we are trying to solve and how we can we use this convergence of information to better understand people.  Translating the new “understanding” into future opportunities means that the role of a researcher is changing. FOCI accelerates disruptive innovators in the research space and pushes people to take risks, to think outside of traditional research methods and insights gathering and explore new and alternative tools and technologies. FOCI will bridge the gap between what people say they are going to do and what they actually do.
Here is what Magnus had to say:
IIR: A big theme of this year’s conference is ‘humanization of data.’ Why do you think understanding PEOPLE (not consumers) presents an opportunity for strategic action?
Magnus: Because people have secrets and all opportunities begin as secrets.
IIR: How is technology not only changing how we do things, but also how we understand the world, business, and people?
Magnus: It visualizes the fringes of society in a new way. Before, the mainstream was dominant by its strength in numbers. But in the ‘thoughtsphere’, a Minnesota flute tribe or Namibian upstart company can have the same perceived presence as a king or queen.
IIR: How has consumer intelligence strategy and action planning helped drive your business?
Magnus: It only helped early on as I was learning the ropes. Once you grasp the basics, you are free to challenge them known as “you-have-to-get-an-invite-to-change-music’-paradigm.
IIR: How has the role of ‘the researcher’ changed?
Magnus: The title has been completely eroded in that everyone points ‘research’ these days and quotes some arcane, Googled study. But I see the role of the good researcher as having been expanded and deepened in that everything from product innovations to president reelections use research as their fuel.
IIR: Describe a situation where you’ve taken a risk or thought outside the box of tradition market research methods. How did that benefit your business?
Magnus: All available research said the book business is a dying market. I wrote three books anyway. They all failed.
IIR: Where do you see the emerging space of marketing science and role of data scientists in the next five years?
Magnus: I see a new role emerging called Chief Imagination Officer or C.Im.O.
IIR: How has the increasingly connected consumer affected market research?
Magnus: Negatively. It dilutes opinions. It’s harder to find quirky, off-the-grid people who give those valuable sideways kind of insights.

Want to hear more from Magnus in person? Join him at Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014 in Los Angeles, CA in May. Magnus will be presenting a keynote entitled, ‘When The Future Begins – A Guide to Long-Term Thinking’ on Wednesday, May 21st at 12:00 pm. To learn more about the event and register, click here: http://bit.ly/1lGi6Ur
** As a reader of our blog, you get an exclusive 15% discount on your FOCI 2014 pass. Use code FOCI14BLOG when you register **

About the Author: Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs including Next Big DesignCustomers 1st, and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business Analysts, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc.

Tweet & Win a Free Pass to The Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014

Fans and followers of the The Future of Consumer Intelligence
are invited to enter the Tweet & Win
Contest 
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    Intelligence 2014
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The Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014 explores the
emerging role of decision science and the convergence of knowledge points -
insights, foresights, social science, marketing science and intelligence with
technology as a central driving force and profound connector. The Future of
Consumer Intelligence, 
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