Tag Archives: consumer insight

This Week In Market Research: 10/19/15 – 10/23/15

This week I came across a very interesting article on Buzzfeed that discussed the gender gap in people who own and or buy drones. The article discusses the issue from a marketing standpoint on how the drone market, which is generating more than $5 billion in revenue, can reach the female audience. The author explains how, upon doing research on women and girls with drones, ”only 3 included images of women and girls engaging with drones, compared to 18 for men and boys. On Shutterstock, I found 4 girls, 28 boys, 12 women, and over 100 men. (The search terms I used were ‘drone,’ ‘drone man,’ ‘drone woman,’ ‘drone girl,’ and ‘drone boy.’ The numbers are taken from looking through the images ‘ discounting unrelated pictures and aerial shots.)’ The article also points out that some attempts have been made to appeal to the female market, although they can be seen as a step in the wrong direction. Some drone booths, in their attempt to reach women, have women dress in revealing clothing to hand out T-shirts that say ‘Chicks dig drone pilots.’ However there are the few marketers that feature, in my opinion, more appropriate tactics such as strong women doing what they love and being featured on drone technology. Upon reading the article, however, I’m still not convinced that the majority of these tactics are moving the female image in the right direction. What do you think?
It’s that time of year again, folks! The infamous Black Friday is approaching us and everyone is stampeding toward’their phones? That’s right. In an article posted on Adage this week, Google is claiming that more consumers are actually using their smartphones to complete Black Friday purchases. ‘More consumers are shelving the traditional, daylong Black Friday shopping experience for short, burst-like purchases made with their smartphones that are spread out over a period of time, or what Google is calling ‘micro-moments.” According to Google’s blog, ‘shopping moments’ will replace the idea of a ‘shopping marathon’ where people spend the night outside of a Best Buy just to cram into the store and buy the latest gadgets for half price. The article presents compelling evidence and numerous studies that show consumers, more and more, are purchasing holiday items from their mobile devices. This comes as great news to someone like myself, who can’t stand waiting in lines and being in a crowded department store. It will be interesting to see the numbers from this upcoming Black Friday as compared to last year to really see the decline as well.
Last week many Advertisers and Marketers ascended upon the Orlando World Center Marriott to attend the Association of national Advertisers’ Masters of Marketing Conference. However, in an Adage article posted this week, many attendees did not find answers to some of their major questions. Questions such as, ‘how does our company get around ad blockers’? received very few, if any, remarks. ‘In Orlando, Mr. Liodice (The group’s CEO) moved quickly off ad blocking, as well as brief mentions of ad fraud, ad viewability problems and a “degenerative and destructive” proposal in Congress to reduce the tax deduction for ad spending. ‘With as many challenges as our industry has,’ he said, ‘we have a growing abundance of opportunities.” Answers such as this one were not received well with companies hoping for a strong and absolute response. However, the article also suggests that perhaps the answer to this direct question lies within General Electric CMO Linda Boff’s suggestion that the answer is as ‘simple as creativity.’ ”Ad blocking, viewability, none of it matters without great work.”

Nichole Dicharry, is a Digital Marketing Assistant at IIR USA, Marketing and Finance Divisions, who works on various aspects of the industry including social media, marketing analysis and media. She can be reached at Ndicharry@iirusa.com

This Week In Market Research: 8/17/15 – 8/21/15

To begin summarizing this article I am compelled to share the first couple of lines from the article itself because they are too great not to share:
‘If you order Man Crates’s $49.99 “Snack Sensei” gift box, it will arrive in a cardboard box that contains a sealed plywood crate, a mini crowbar, and a card that says, “If at first you don’t succeed, pry, pry again.” It will not be easy to open. And by the time your boyfriend, father, brother, or other male-person gift recipient has actually applied the necessary amount of force, he will have created “a scene.” A crowd of coworkers will be gathered around his desk (because, let’s be real, you’ve sent this potential spectacle to the office), and splinters of wood will sit scattered on his carpeted cubicle floor like small monuments to his middle-America brand of manliness. Hammers will probably be involved.
Inside, he’ll find an array of Japanese candy. And Man Crates founder Jon Beekman is basically already giggling as he winds up to tell me, “The candy guide also comes in Japanese, so you have no idea what you’re actually eating!”
This hysterical lead-in introduces the main topic of the article of how personality of a small business can counter Amazon and its grip on e-commerce. The company being described above, Man Crates, was founded by Jon Beekman in 2011 after discovering the ‘gift baskets for men’ category. The foundation for this organization’s competitive strategy is to give personality to the online shopping experience once it reaches your door. As far as market research goes, 70% of the purchasers are women buying the gifts for men. Clearly this ‘personality tactic’ is reaching a particular audience and appealing to women online shoppers.
This week, the Sioux Falls Business Journal sat down with Erin Healy, a consumer insights specialist at Lawrence and Schiller. Throughout the piece, Healy gives advice to businesses hoping to use consumer insight effectively as well as discussing the most interesting and exciting parts of her market research job. ‘Something that any business can do is to truly know your customers. Consumers search for both rational and emotional reasons to use your business or brand. Consumer insights dives into how consumers think and helps people understand why that consumer choice was made in the first place. If businesses can understand why their customers use their services and products, it will be easier to establish and build meaningful relationships with them.’ Healy also explains how a ‘good insight’ take a lot of effort and time and that finding that insight is very gratifying at the end. She concludes the interview by stating ‘you know you’ve got a great insight ‘ when you realize it’s not necessarily a complex answer.’

Technology mixed with learning in schools is excellent right?? Well according to some skeptics and market researchers in the field of technology and its ‘return on learning,’ technology and education may not be correlated positively. Rob Mancabelli, the cofounder and CEO of Bright Bytes, claims that ”Over $10 billion is spent on technology every year in the U.S., and the majority of it does not benefit learning outcomes.’” In his conclusions, the data that they have gathered from the effectiveness of multimedia in learning remains very incomplete at its best. This is very interesting analysis as we see many schools and even organizations trying to incorporate multimedia into the learning process. What do you think?
Being an Entrepreneur is hard; it’s even harder if you fall into myths associated with the title. Entrepreneur released an article this week that discusses common myths that can hold an entrepreneur back and not be able to reach full potential. A few of the myths listed include thinking you’re ‘the boss’ and that you’ll be able to set your own salary. ‘As boss, you do get to set the agenda. However, you’ll also be on call and accountable to a range of different people, including employees, customers, the IRS, venture capitalists, angel investors and partners.’ The article also explains that while you may be able to adjust your salary, the cash flow is essential for any small business when it’s starting. In other words, many new entrepreneurs can’t afford to pay themselves much money in order to keep the business going. Read more about the common myths that may hold an entrepreneur back here.

Nichole Dicharry, is a Digital Marketing Assistant at IIR USA, Marketing and Finance Divisions, who works on various aspects of the industry including social media, marketing analysis and media. She can be reached at Ndicharry@iirusa.com 

Talking with 2.5 Million Teen/20-sums: DoSomething.org COO Has Tips

Old Crank Hijacks Blog to Carp About “Kids These Days”

By Marc Dresner
As I sat down to write this post I had two depressing thoughts
and I figured I might as well drag you down with me:

1. I am
officially ‘old.’ (And if you’re 26 years of age or over, sorry, but so are you.)

2. I am
out of touch. (And if you spend a lot of time talking about ‘youth culture,’ might
be you’re out of touch, too.)

That first fun fact came courtesy of
DoSomething.org under a section on its website dubbed ‘Old People’ that
unapologetically states: ‘If you’re 26+ we
consider you officially ‘old.’ This is an org for young people.’
Aria Finger
source: Crain’s New York


(Well I didn’t want to join your stupid org anyway! Pbbt’)

The second bit I deduced’but only after chasing some
teenagers off my lawn’from a comment made by DoSomething.org’s COO, Aria
Finger, who suggested that old people who talk about young people in sweeping
generalizations probably don’t understand them as well as they think.
‘You hear people generalizing a
lot. ‘Oh, young people like to share,’ and so on,’ said Finger. ‘We need to
remember that young people are diverse.’

”Young
people’ isn’t some homogenous panacea.’
”Young people’ isn’t some homogenous panacea,’ she added.

She’s right, of course. And we’re
all guilty of it.

Marketers and researchers, in
particular, love to label and wrap blanket statements around entire
generational cohorts.
It’s how we make sense of (and
market to) the world. Show me a statistician who doesn’t dehumanize people for
a living.
Now, no one is saying that
there isn’t any truth (or utility, for that matter) to statements like ‘Young
people like to share,’ etc.
But we probably make or accept them more often than
is advisable for the sake of expedience.

Myth:
Teenagers are usually on the cutting edge of technology
We all know, for example, that Gen Z’ er, Post-Millennials?
Gen Next? ‘What are we calling these kids we’re generalizing about anyway?!?
Gen TBD?
Whatever they are, they’re ‘digital natives,’ right?
The teens are into all the cutting edge technology, right?
Wrong. Finger says that’s a big misconception.
Well, ok, but they sure seem tech-savvy. (Help me with my DVR, please!)
I mean, what about their smartphones? All the kids
have smartphones. We didn’t have smartphones when I went to high school…
And most middle-class teens in the U.S. today still
don’t, Finger noted, which is why SMS text remains such a powerful communication
tool.
And just where does she get her information, you ask?
Why from DoSomething.org’s 2.5 million members ages
25 and under, of course.

 ‘We can send a text to 1.6 million young
people and get up to 70,000 responses in minutes.’
‘We can send a text to 1.6 million young people and
get up to 70,000 responses in a matter of minutes,’ Finger told The Research Insighter.
(For
any out-of-touch oldies, DoSomething is a pretty-big-deal-not-for-profit dedicated
to ‘making the world suck less’ by connecting teens and early 20-somethings to
social causes that matter to them.)
Finger
is also president of TMI, DoSomething’s agency subsidiary specializing in
research and consulting services around youth, technology and social change.
As a
result, Finger knows a thing or two about the kids and how to communicate with
them.
And in this podcast with The Research Insighter
interview series, Finger shares some tips for talking with young people, including:

‘ Why ‘if you build it they will come’ isn’t a great
mobile strategy

‘ How to keep an authentic two-way text dialogue
going with thousands of young people

‘ Why brands shouldn’t necessarily just take the
kids’ word for it when it comes to preferences, and more’
Editor’s
note:
Aria Finger will present ‘Using Mobile and Data Insights to Activate
Youth’ at The Future of Consumer Intelligence Conference taking place May 19th
through the 21st in Universal City, California.


SAVE 15% to attend The Future of Consumer Intelligence when you use code FOCI14BLOG today! 

For
more information or to register, please visit www.futureofconsumerintel.com


Old Crank

ABOUT THE AUTHOR / INTERVIEWER 
Marc Dresner is IIR USA’s sr. editor and special communication project lead. He is the former executive editor of Research Business Report, a confidential newsletter for the marketing research and consumer insights industry. He may be reached at mdresner@iirusa.com. Follow him @mdrezz.

Building Communities for Insight and Consumer Advocacy

One of our sister events Voice of the Customer has put together a free webinar which I thought I’d pass along on this blog. Aliza Freud, the Founder and CEO of SheSpeaks will be presenting Building Communities for Insight and Consumer Advocacy on Thursday, November 6, 2008 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EST. Mention priority code G1M2039W1BL when you register. Here’s a brief recap of the webinar:

The SheSpeaks platform creates community and connects brands to our members to capture consumer insights, build word-of-mouth recommendations and brand advocates. SheSpeaks has developed an expertise in building community among women that inspires them to become brand ambassadors.

This presentation will describe the four components that are required to create a strong community and how each component functions in that process. We will provide examples of how brands have used these components to achieve success and how we integrate each component in our process at SheSpeaks.

What you will learn by attending:
- What is SheSpeaks and how does it work?
- Why should a brand build a community?
- What are the four components of creating a strong community?
- How can you build community for your brand?

As always, check back regularly as we will be posting community related webinars here. Register for this webinar here.

https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/760721425