Tag Archives: Conference

Study Compares Recall Versus In-the-Moment Surveys

This post was originally published on mfour’s Blog.

If you want to know what consumers buy, you’d better not
hesitate to ask. Because if you don’t ask fast enough, your data will fall into
a recall gap ‘ the chasm that opens when you rely on days-old (or weeks-old)
memories instead of capturing consumer sentiment when the experience is fresh
in mind. 
That’s the takeaway from a comparative study MFour conducted
to explore how memory decay impacts data reliability. The results underscore
how using GPS-enabled technology lets you reach the right consumers in the
right place at the right time for insights that can truly drive the right
business decisions. 
The study involved fielding essentially the same mobile
survey to two demographically similar groups of 200 consumers. GeoLocation told
us that our first group had been shopping that very day in at least one of the
five retailer categories in the study ‘ grocery stores, convenience stores,
drug stores, membership club stores, and mass merchants. 
These panelists were identified inside specific stores and
received in-app push notifications just as they walked out the door to learn
about their shopping experiences. The non-GeoLocated control group was asked
about most recent shopping experiences in the same store types ‘ which may have
occurred days, weeks, or even months earlier. 
Key Findings

??        
When asked to state whether they had purchased
products in any of eight general categories (beverages, personal care, etc.)
during their most recent store visit, all 200 GeoLocated respondents named one
or more categories. Not one of them selected the ‘Don’t know/Can’t remember’
option.
??        
That contrasts with 28% of the non-GeoLocated
control group who said they could not remember which product categories they’d
purchased during their most recent store visit.
??        
There were also significant gaps when it came to
recalling the brands our respondents had bought. The GeoLocated group had a
brand recall advantage for 13 of 16 specific product types.
??        
Notable brand recall gaps include differences of
23.8% for facial cleansers, 14.1% for juices, 13.4% for feminine hygiene
products, 12.3% for shampoos/conditioners, and 10.1% for snack chips.
Conclusion 

Talking to consumers when an experience is fresh in mind is
crucial for obtaining accurate data about any kind of experience. Exploiting
GeoLocation and other key smartphone features takes you as close to the moment
of purchasing truth as you can get without tagging along in person. This is why
a Point of Emotion?? response, capturing data the moment when information is at
its most memorable, is the most reliable way to understand what consumers
really think. 
To learn more about how to keep your research from falling into the
recall gap, just reach out by clicking sales@mfour.com.
And be sure to check the MFour blog throughout the week for more insights from
this study.

Malcolm Gladwell, Authenticity & The Trump Era

In our profession, those who can foretell market trends will
always embody a competitive edge.
In the last 15 years, we’ve built TMRE: The Market Research Event into the
Market Research & Insights industry’s number one opportunity to learn from
and network with the brightest, boldest thought leaders in our industry.
This October, we’re thrilled to present the most
well-curated TMRE ever – with tons of all-new, trend-worthy topics, speakers
and sessions that smash the mold!
Here’s what we’ll be
buzzing about at TMRE 2017:

??        
Superstar author Malcolm Gladwell reveals how
embracing technology has helped him forge new connections with his audience -
and what those lessons can teach our evolving industry.
??        
The new U.S. administration has created
unforeseen realities and risks for brands, with “authenticity”
emerging as a buzzword of the year. Peter Horst, former Chief Marketing
Officer, The Hershey Company. helps leaders navigate this changing environment
in Marketing in the Trump Age.
??        
Introducing the Breakthrough Technology Start-Up
Showcase, a chance to meet the biggest and most disruptive industry start-ups,
while networking with the leaders who’ll shape our industry for years to come.
??        
Brand-new for TMRE 2017, we’ve partnered with
Women in Research (WiRE) to present the Women in Research Awards, honoring
outstanding female industry leaders, movers and shakers. 
Request the TMRE 2017
Brochure:
https://goo.gl/HkCp3u

And that’s not all!
??        
All New! Future-proof yourself at TMRE 2017′s
Industry Specific Days
??        
All New! Discover what today’s C-Suite really
wants to hear at the Chief Marketing Officer Forum
??        
1,100+ international executives & thought
leaders
??        
150+ speakers & 120+ content-driven
sessions!
??        
65% client-side attendance!
TMRE is the premier event for Market Research and Consumer
Insights thought leaders – an unparalleled opportunity to jump-start your
career, build an all-star network and invigorate your brand.
Use exclusive blog
discount code TMRE17BL for $100 off the current rate: 

Cheers,
The TMRE Team
@TMRE

#TMREvent 

4 Best Practices for Optimizing Packaging for E-Commerce

This post
was originally published on PRS IN VIVO’s blog.

How a new design system is introduced in market can
significantly influence sales.  Here are four ‘best practices for
minimizing risk:
1. Foster Brand
Recognition (via Visual Continuity)

First and foremost, shoppers are looking for reassurance
that they are buying the same product (online) that they know/trust from the
‘brick-and-mortar’ store.  So while pack images may be simplified for Web
‘thumbnails,’ it is important that they retain the brand’s core visual equities
and appearance.
2. Ensure High-Quality
& Informative Visuals

Simply put, some packages ‘ particularly white packs and/or
those that rely on foil, holograms and other tactile elements ‘ do not always
translate well to e-commerce environments and need refinements.  In
addition, a range of images (primary vs. secondary packaging, etc.) may be
necessary to illustrate the functionality and benefits of new packaging
formats.
3. Clearly
Convey/Reassure on Quantity

In the digital context, size impressions can be very
misleading.  Therefore, it is very important to provide clear reassurance
on pack sizing and quantity, particularly to highlight larger sizes.
4. Leverage
Digital Capabilities to Illustrate/Inform 

Perhaps most importantly, the e-commerce context provides
opportunities to inform/educate shoppers that are typically unavailable in
physical environments.  For example, one click can provide a clear explanation
of a full product line, helping shoppers find the right product for their needs
‘ or link to a video illustrate use of a new product.
For more information
about adopting packaging for e-commerce, please read this article here
Or contact PRS IN VIVO to
learn more about our research on the intersection of digital and physical
shopping.

Insights Interview: James Petretti, SVP, Research & Analytics, Sony Pictures TV

In our recent insights interview, we sat down with James Petretti,
Senior Vice President, U.S. Research and Analytics to discuss how to reach the new
age media consumer.
Here’s what Petretti had to say:
What is the state of
the media research industry in 2017?
Petretti: Media Research is more complicated than ever
before ‘ more platforms, more channels, more kinds of content and more measures
than ever before ‘ the different types of data sets, and sheer amount of it
that  we are required to work with today means we need to bring in new
skill sets and core competencies ‘ so it’s a constant learning process on top
of trying to stay on top of an ever-increasing amount of information’ it’s exhilarating
and exhausting at the same time.
What have been the
biggest changes in the industry since you started your career?
Petretti: We’ve
moved from an analog to digital world ‘ that’s changed everything.
Have the influx of
social media and mobile made your job easier or harder?
Petretti: Both ‘
there’s more data to have to consider ‘ but it’s often a rich data set that
allows us to have immediate feedback
How has the media
consumer changed in the past few years?
Petretti: The
Consumer is King today’ they’re in control
How can media
companies do a better job reaching the new age consumer?
Petretti: We need
to make sure we respect the consumer today ‘ when Media was a one to many
medium, media companies were driving the relationship ‘ but that’s changed and
we must respond in kind ‘ we can’t just look at consumers as ‘audience targets’
‘ we must understand them as individuals and consider how we can help satisfy
their needs and expectations.
What is the biggest
challenge in the media industry today?
Petretti: The
Business Model has not yet evolved to meet today’s realities ‘ the ad supported
television model is based on a captive audience trapped in linear time ‘ but
today viewers are liberated with extraordinary options that empower individual
control and increasingly asynchronous viewing.
Where do you see
media research moving in 5 years?

Petretti: Analytics,
Data Science and Data Visualization continue to become increasingly important
disciplines for media researchers ‘ we need to incorporate core competencies
from each to meet the demands of the new media world today and beyond.

Meet the Powerful Women Driving the Future of Customer Insights

TMRE: The Market Research Event and OmniShopper have some
exciting news to share’
Not only is TMRE partnering with WiRE (Women in Research)
for the first annual TMRE/WiRE Women in Research Award to celebrate some true
rock-star researchers, but we’re happy to share a preliminary list of powerful
women in insights confirmed to take the stage at both the TMRE and OmniShopper 2017
events.

Check out the inspiring women speaking at TMRE 2017:


??        
Dawn Cunningham, Chief Insights Officer, 3M
??        
Amber Case, Cyborg Anthropologist, Author, Calm
Technology
??        
Cole Nussbaum Knaffic, Founder, Storytelling
with Data
??        
Kristin Luck, Founder, WiRE: Women in Research
??        
Marina Kosten, VP Research – International
Theatrical, 20th Century Fox
??        
Elizabeth Merrick May, Head of Customer
Insights, Nest
??        
Christina Jenkins, Director, Global Business
Marketing, North America, Twitter
??        
Anna Fieler, Chief Marketing Officer, Popsugar
??        
Lisa Courtade, Head of Market Research, Merck
??        
Judy Melanson, SVP, Travel & Entertainment,
Chadwick Martin Bailey
??        
Amanda Hill, Chief Marketing Officer, A+E
Networks
??        
Margo Arton, Director of Ad Effectiveness
Research, Buzzfeed
??        
Lauren Zweifler, Senior Vice President
,Strategic Insights & Research, NBCUniversal
??        
Terrae Schroeder, Senior Director, Wholesome
& Shopper Insights, NA Snacks, Kellogg
??        
Theresa Pepe, VP of Research, Viacom
??        
Sarita Bhagwat, Vice President, Market
Intelligence, Fidelity Investments
??        
Julie Brown, President, The Center for Strategy
Research
??        
Lori Tarabeck, Global Market Insights, Abbott
Diabetes Care
??        
Renata Polcicio, Vice President, Fan and Media
Intelligence, International, Global Markets, ESPN
??        
Jennifer Avery, Director, Consumer Insights,
Universal Orlando Resort
??        
Sara Fahim, Senior Research & Innovation
Consultant, Seek Company
??        
Tiffany Sanders, Business Intelligence &
Research, CBS
??        
Emily Akinson, Insights & Planning, Consumer
& Market Insights, Kellogg
??        
Mary Beth Jowers, Consumer Insights Lead for
North, Central and Eastern Europe, Gruppo Campari
??        
Stephanie Cunningham, Senior Manager, Customer
Insights & Analytics, eBay
??        
Lina Roncancio, Insights & Innovation
Director, Discovery Communications Latin America
??        
Michelle Gansle, Director, Consumer & Market
Insights, Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company
??        
Karin Kricorian, Director, Management Science
and Integration, Disney
??        
Sarah Beachler, Director, Market Research &
Client Insights, Sephora
??        
Beth Coleman, SVP Marketing and Partner
Insights, Viacom
??        
Samantha Dawkins, Vice President, Client
Strategy & Advocacy, ADP
??        
Gabriela McCoy, Director of Global Consumer
Insights, Bacardi
??        
Kassie Deng, Director, Marketing & Partner
Insights, Viacom
??        
Lyndsey Albertson, Director of Sales Research,
ABC
??        
Maria Cristina Antonio, Director, Metabolic
Insights & Analytics, Novo Nordisk
??        
Julia Oswald, Senior Vice President, Strategy
& Insights, Domino’s Pizza
??        
Carley Metsker, Vice President, Client Service,
Directions Research
??        
Monika Mandrakas, Market Researcher &
Customer Advocate, Mutual of Omaha
View the TMRE brochure
for a full list of speakers:
https://goo.gl/1Ricj2
Check out the inspiring women speaking at OmniShopper 2017:

??        
Shopper Marketing Activations: Marketing &
Merchandising: J Lynn Martinez, Vice President & Team Lead Kroger, Dr
Pepper Snapple Group
??        
Customer Experience Design: How Research &
Design Collaborate to Build New and Differentiated Experiences: Kate Kompelien,
Customer Experience – Center for Excellence for Research & Strategy, Best
Buy
??        
Omnichannel Customer Analysis: Lakshmi
Venkataramari, Senior Director, Customer Insights & Analytics, Walmart
eCommerce
??        
Winning in Her Purse: Kelley Styring, Principal,
InsightFarm
??        
Knowledge is Power, If You Can Find It: Ashley
Starke & Diana Powell, Manager, Shopper Insights, ConAgra Foods
??        
Team Structure Doesn’t Matter: Sue Butler, Director
of Omnichannel Insights, Walmart
??        
Going Beyond Behavior to Drive Category Growth:
Monica Melichar, Senior Manager, Consumer Insights, Beam Suntory & Erin
Barber, Senior Vice President, C+R Research
??        
Longitudinal Data & the Low Purchase
Frequency Category: Stacy Carty, Shopper Insights, Samsung
??        
Driving Change While Driving the Business:
Improving Tools & Automation: Theresa Hendrickson, Director, eCommerce
Engineering – Business Tools & Processes, Best Buy
View the OmniShopper
Brochure for a full list of speakers: https://goo.gl/Qw8Juo
Use exclusive
LinkedIn discount code TMRE17LI for $100 off the current rate. Buy tickets to
TMRE now:
https://goo.gl/1Ricj2
Use exclusive
LinkedIn discount code OMNI17LI for $100 off the current rate. Buy tickets to
OmniShopper now:
https://goo.gl/Qw8Juo
Also, don’t miss our
upcoming free webinar ‘Storytelling with Data’ http://bit.ly/2o0bpAS
featuring speakers Kelsy Saulsbury, Manager, Consumer Insight & Analytics,
Schwan’s Shared Services, LLC and Bill Greenwald, Founder and Chief
Neuroleaderologist, Windsor Leadership Group, LLC. 
Driving the value of
insights forward requires much more than just unearthing great data. You need
to use that data to tell a story and command influence across the broader
organization. Because storytelling may not be an inherent skill, this webinar
focuses on how to use data to create an engaging, informative, compelling
story.  Register for the webinar here:
http://bit.ly/2o0bpAS
Cheers,
The TMRE & OmniShopper Teams
@TMRE
@OmniShopper

Why Social Influence is Important in Business: Q&A with Jonah Berger

We were lucky enough to recently catch up with one of our
favorite conference speakers Jonah Berger, who is well-known as a Wharton
Professor and Bestselling Author of Invisible
Influence
and Contagious:
Why Things Catch On
.
Berger shared some key insights about why social
influence is key to business from his new book Invisible Influence.

Here’s what Jonah had to say:
What is ‘social
influence’?
Berger: Social
influence is the impact people have on others around them. We vote if our
spouse is voting, run faster if someone else is watching us, or switch our entr??e
if someone at the table orders the same thing.  In each instance, others’
behavior influences or affects our own. Those others can be spouses and
friends, but also people we never even talk to, like the stranger sitting next
to us on the plane.  Social influence effects small things, like the food
we eat, but also big things like the career we choose or whether we save money
for retirement. Ninety-nine-point-nine percent of all decisions are shaped by
others. It’s hard to find a decision or behavior that isn’t affected by other
people.
Why is social
influence important in business?
Berger: If we
understand how influence works, we can harness its power. We can convince
a client, change the boss’ mind, and motivate employees to take action.  One section of the book, for example, talks
about how being a chameleon can make you more successful. Researchers looked at
what makes someone a good negotiator. 
What makes them more likely to reach a deal when all looks
lost. And they found that one simple trick led negotiators to be 5x as
successful. That trick?  Imitating or mimicking the language,
behavior, or facial expressions of their negotiating partner. If their partner
crossed their legs, they did the same.  And if their partner leaned back
in the chair, they did so as well. Not obviously, but subtly mirroring
their partner.  Turns out the same trick works in a range of
contexts. Waiters or waitresses that mimic their patrons’ orders get 70%
higher tips.  Mimicry increases liking, trust, and affiliation.  It
deepens social bond and makes people feel a kinship that turns strangers into
friends and acquaintances into allies.
Why is social
influence key to reaching the right customers?
Berger: Word of
mouth is 10x as effective as traditional advertising. People trust it more and
its more targeted.  So, to reach the right customers, we have to turn our
existing customers into advocates. Use social influence to get them to
talk about and share our message and bring new converts in along the way. 
 
How can individuals
harness the power of social influence to make better decisions in their
personal lives?  
Berger: If we
understand how influence works, we can take advantage of its benefits and avoid
its downsides. Following others can provide a useful shortcut that saves
time and effort. If lots of people chose or did something, it’s probably pretty
good. So, others can be a valuable source of information, a heuristic that
simplifies decision making. Other times, however, following others can
lead us astray.  So, simple tricks like considering whether others have
the same preferences as we do can help us avoid going the wrong way.
Have you ever been personally affected by the power of
social influence? What is an example?
Certainly. I was telling lawyer friend of mine from DC about
the book and he was lamenting the effect of social influence on his
colleagues. He said the first thing new lawyers in DC do when they make
partner is go out and buy a BMW.  I said that was interesting, but then
pointed out that he himself was a DC lawyer and drove a BMW. He said yes, but
they all drive grey BMWs. I bought a blue one.
What I love about this story is that it perfectly
encapsulates the tension inherent in social influence.  People often think
being influenced means doing the same thing as others, but it’s more complex
than that.  There’s more than one flavor of influence. Sure, sometimes we
imitate those around us, but we also care about standing out and being
unique.  So, when do we do the same thing as others and when do we do
something different. 
In your book, you
share an experiment about cockroaches and how their behavior changed when they
had an audience.  What insights can you share about how we behave when our
actions are observed?
Berger: It makes
sense that people and animals might work harder when there is a
competition.  If two pigeons are racing to get the last piece of bread, or
two people are competing to win a golf tournament, the desire to achieve the
reward or win the competition might lead people and animals to work harder.
Even the mere presence of others though, can have similar effects. 
Cockroaches, for example, ran faster through a maze when
other cockroaches were watching them, even though those others weren’t directly
competing.  People behave similarly.  The mere fact that someone is
watching us can increase motivation and performance.  But for new or
difficult tasks, others can sometimes have the opposite effect.  Having
someone else in the car when we’re trying to parallel park, for example, makes
it harder for most of us to fit in the spot.  So, whether others presence
helps or hurts depends on the nature of the task.

Q&A with Nielsen’s Chief Research Officer Mainak Mazumbar

In our Insights Interview series, we sit down with insights
executives to discuss the state of insights and where it’s going in the future.
We were fortunate to catch up with Nielsen’s Chief Research Officer Mainak
Mazumbar recently.
Here’s what he had to say:
What is the state of
the media research industry in 2017?
Mazumbar: Acceleration
of fragmentation and digitization of media will continue to create unique
opportunities for the media research industry. 2017 is the year when media
research will deliver massive measurement innovation by incorporating various
data (e.g. mobile devices, set top boxes, over the top, location etc) into the
current measurement methodologies in ways no one ever has before.
What have been the
biggest changes in the industry since you started your career’?
Mazumbar: Decline
in consumer participation in surveys and rapid adoption of mobile devices have
posed methodological and measurement challenges. Researchers have much better
insights into media behavior than before because of digital data. New open
source tools and cloud now allows researcher to deliver measurement at speed
and scale’. New data science talent who are versed both in statistics and
computing.
Have the influx of
social media and mobile made your job easier or harder?
Mazumbar: It’s definitely
easier because social and mobile data now allow us deeper understanding of
media consumption in almost real time. The challenge is how we, as researchers,
develop methodologies addressing both scale and speed.
How has the media
consumer changed in the past few years?
Mazumbar: While
we see continued fragmentation, consumers are spending more time on media than
ever before. I think mobile and new forms of video make a huge difference and
have revolutionized how we consume and interact with media.
How can media
companies do a better job reaching the new age consumer?
Mazumbar: Continue
pushing forward new strategies for mobile and video.
What is the biggest
challenge in the media industry today?
Mazumbar: Three
challenges:
1) It’s all about consumers’ “attention” on
various platforms and devices
2) Get ahead of fraud/ viewability issues and regain
advertiser’s and consumer trust
3) Data protection and privacy
Where do you see
media research moving in 5 years?

Mazumbar: There is an increasing
need for a third party and objective view of consumer behavior. This will
require researchers to develop independent and high quality data sets that
reflect the true behavior of real people — to address biases, limitations and
incompleteness of device level data. And the speed at which clients need to
make business decisions is increasing. Therefore, we need to deliver research
and insights with speed and scale.
Want more expert insights on the market research industry? Attend one
of upcoming 2017 insights events:
Marketing Analytics
& Data Science
April 3-5, 2017
San Francisco, CA
Use code MADS17LI for $100 off.
Buy tickets: https://goo.gl/YqXZdx

TMRE in Focus
May 1-3, 2017
Chicago, IL
Use code FOCUS17LI for $100 off.
Buy tickets: https://goo.gl/c2UdIv

OmniShopper
June 20-22, 2017
Minneapolis, MN
Use code OMNI17LI for $100 off.
Buy tickets: https://goo.gl/oUB85g 

TMRE: The Market
Research Event
October 22-25, 2017
Orlando, FL
Use code TMRE17LI for $100 off

Buy tickets: https://goo.gl/SKtcUv

Online Ad Effectiveness Research Grows Up

 This article is
brought to you by Survata.

The days of giving
digital a pass are over. It’s time to grow up.’- Marc
Pritchard, Chief Branding Officer, Procter & Gamble, January 2017
When the CBO of P&G tells us to grow up,
we listen. And after speaking with clients at last month’s Media Insights
Conference, it’s clear that there’s consensus: online advertising research
needs to get more sophisticated.
We’re here to help. IAB breaks research down into phases: design, recruitment & deployment, and
optimization. We’ll walk through each phase and determine what’s most in need
of ‘growing up.’ We’ll also include questions to ask your research partner to
help increase the sophistication of your ad effectiveness research.
Design

Let’s start by acknowledging that
statistically sound online ad effectiveness research has not been easy to
implement at reasonable cost until recently. As IAB notes, ‘Questions around recruitment, sample bias and deployment are
hampering the validity of this research and undermining the industry as a
whole.’
Just because perfect research design is
challenging to achieve doesn’t mean that advertisers should settle for studies
with debilitating flaws, leading to biased, unreliable results. In addition to
challenges inherent to good research design, most ad effectiveness research
partners have systematic biases due to the way they find respondents, which
must be accounted for in the design phase. There has been innovation in this
space within the past year using technology to reduce or eliminate systematic
bias in respondent recruitment. 
Assuming you’re able to address the systematic
bias of your research partner’s sampling, the major remaining challenge is how
you approach the control group. At Survata, we think about this as a hierarchy: 
Using a holdout group is best practice, but
implementing it requires spending some portion of your ad budget strictly on
the control group. In other words, some of your ad budget will be spent on
intentionally NOT showing people an ad. A small portion of people in the ad buy
will instead be shown public service announcements to establish the control
group. We love the purity of this approach, but we also understand the reality
of advertising budgets. We don’t view holdout as a requirement for sound online
ad effectiveness research. Smart design combined with technology can achieve
methodologically sound control groups without ‘wasting’ ad budget.
Along those lines, the Audience Segment
approach has become de facto best practice for many of our clients. Basically,
you create your control group from the same audience segment that you’re
targeting in the ad buy. This isn’t perfect, as there could be an underlying
reason that some people in the segment saw the ad but others didn’t (e.g., some
people very rarely go online, or to very few websites), but it’s still an excellent
approach. It’s the grown-up version of Demographic Matching.
Demographic Matching, in which the control
group is created by matching as many demographic variables as possible with the
exposed group (e.g., gender, age, income), is still a very common strategy.
It’s straightforward to accomplish even using old online research
methodologies. As online data has allowed us to learn far more useful
information about consumers than demographic traits, this approach is dated.
Simply sampling GenPop as a control is
undesirable. The results are much more likely to reveal the differences between
the exposed and control groups than the effectiveness of the advertising.
Questions for your research partner:
  • What are known biases among
    respondents due to recruitment strategy?
  • What is your total reach? What
    percentage of the target group is within your reach? Is it necessary to
    weight low-IR population respondents due to lack of scale?
  • What’s your approach to creating
    control groups for online ad effectiveness research?
  • For Demographic Matching, how do
    you determine which demographic characteristics are most important to
    match?
  • How do you accomplish Audience
    Segment matching?
Recruitment/ Deployment

Historically, there were four methods to recruit respondents / deploy the
survey: panels, intercepts, in-banner, or email list. To stomach these
methodologies, researchers had to ignore one of the following flaws:
non-response bias, misrepresentation, interruption of the customer experience
or email list atrophy. In our view, these methodologies are now dated since the
advent of the publisher network methodology.

The publisher network works by offering
consumers content, ad-free browsing, or other benefits (e.g. free Wi-Fi) in
exchange for taking a survey. The survey is completed as an alternative to
paying for the content or service after the consumer organically visits the
publisher. In addition to avoiding the flaws of the old methodologies, the
publisher network model provides dramatically increased accuracy, scale, and speed.
Questions for your research partner:
  • What incentives are offered in
    exchange for respondent participation?
  • What are the attitudinal,
    behavioral, and demographic differences between someone willing to be in a
    panel versus someone not interested in being in a panel?
  • What are the attitudinal,
    behavioral, and demographic differences between someone willing to take a
    site intercept survey versus someone not interested in taking a site
    intercept survey?
  • How much does non-response bias
    affect the data?
  • Are you integrated with the
    client’s DMP?
  • How long to get the survey into
    the field, and how long until completed?
  • How does the vendor ensure that
    exposure bias doesn’t occur?
  • How does the vendor account for
    straight-liners, speeders, and other typical data quality issues?
Optimization

An optimal ad effectiveness campaign returns results quickly, so that immediate
and continuous adjustments can be made to replace poorly performing creative,
targeting, and placements with higher performing ones. We call this real-time
spend allocation. It’s analogous to real-time click-through rate optimization,
as it relies on solutions to the same math problem (known as the multi-armed bandit).

By integrating with DMPs, ad effectiveness
research can be cross-tabbed against even more datasets. The results will yield
additional insights about a company’s existing customers.
Questions for your research partner:
  • Are results reported real-time?
  • How much advertising budget is
    wasted due to non-optimization?
  • How can DMP data be incorporated
    to improve ad research?
Conclusion

Flawed research methodologies can’t grow up,
they can only continue to lower prices for increasingly suspect data. For
online ad effectiveness research to grow up, new methodologies must be adopted.

To learn more about
conducting your own ad effectiveness study, visit Survata

Must See Talks from KNect365′s Spring Insights 2017 Events

From former gang leaders, to cyborg anthropologists, to
biomimicry experts- KNect365′s Must See Talks will challenge you to look at
problems in a whole new way and become an ignitor of change for your organization.
‘The Centrality of a Detailed Understanding of your
Audience’ ‘ Haile Owusu, Chief Data Scientist, Mashable
Marketing Analytics & Data Science
April 3-5, 2017
San Francisco, CA
Use code MADS17LI for $100 off.
Buy tickets to see Haile: https://goo.gl/YqXZdx
‘The Consumer Influence ‘ and Impact ‘ of Virtual
Reality’ ‘ Jeremy Bailenson, Founding Director of Stanford University’s Virtual
Human Interaction Lab at Stanford University
TMRE in Focus
May 1-3, 2017
Chicago, IL
Use code FOCUS17LI for $100 off.
Buy tickets to see Jeremy: https://goo.gl/c2UdIv
‘Originals: How Non-Conformists Rule the World’ ‘ Adam
Grant, Professor, Author of Give and Take and Originals at The Wharton School
of Business at the University of Pennsylvania
OmniShopper
June 20-22, 2017
Minneapolis, MN
Use code OMNI17LI for $100 off.
Buy tickets to see Adam: https://goo.gl/oUB85g
‘Underdogs, Misfits
& the Art of Battling Giants’ ‘ Malcom Gladwell, Best-Selling Author of
Outliers, The Tipping Point and David & Goliath
TMRE: The Market Research Event
October 22-25, 2017
Orlando, FL
Use code TMRE17LI for $100 off.
Buy tickets to see
Malcom:
https://goo.gl/gM7Dtv
We hope to see you this
spring!
Cheers,

The KNect 365 Event Team

The Ruthless Efficiency of Algorithms is Advancing Digital Frontiers

We recently caught up with Alistair Croll, Visiting
Executive at Harvard Business School as well as our Marketing Analytics &
Data Science Conference keynote speaker, to discuss the state of marketing
analytics and data science, and where it’s going in the future.
Today, Croll helps to accelerate startups, and works with
some of the world’s biggest companies on business model innovation. As an
entrepreneur, he co-founded Coradiant; the Year One Labs accelerator; and a many
other startups. Not to mention, he’s a sought-after speaker, and has launched
and chaired some of the world’s leading conferences on emerging technology,
including Startupfest, Strata, Cloud Connect, and Pandemon.io. Croll is also the
author of four books on technology and entrepreneurship, including the
best-selling Lean Analytics, which has been translated into eight languages.
What is the state of
the data science and analytics industry in 2017?

Croll: There is a realization that data itself doesn’t lead
to answers. This is really maturity: It’s asking the right question that’s
hard. Big data is replacing business intelligence, but most of it is still
being used to run reports and batch processes’rather than to find advantage or
insight.
At the same time, feeding the corpus of data into learning
algorithms holds promise. Those with the authority to do so are pointing
machine learning at their data seta to find correlations, then testing those
for causal relationships they can exploit.
What have been the
biggest changes data science and analytics since you started your career?

Croll: I’m not an analyst by trade. But the biggest change
is clear: once, we first defined the schema, then collected data. Now, we
collect the data, then define the schema.
In other words, “Collect first, ask questions
later.” This is a huge difference, but it has sort of snuck up on us. It
means we can iterate more, answering questions and adjusting our lines of
inquiry.
Have the influx of
social media and mobile made your job easier or harder?

Croll: More data sets mean more potential insights, but also
more spurious correlations. So it’s a two-edged sword.
How is data science
and analytics transforming every industry right now?

Croll: The simple, and somewhat terrifying, truth is that AI
gets unreasonably powerful, very quickly. Whether driving a car, or playing a
video game, or diagnosing a disease, or optimizing the design of an aircraft
part, algorithms are better than humans. They don’t get tired; they make fewer
mistakes; they don’t take breaks.
And what do we feed such algorithms? Data. There is no
industry that will not be changed by the ruthless efficiency of algorithms
advancing its digital frontiers.
Why is data science considered
the ‘sexiest job of the 21st century’?

Croll: Data science is the intersection of statistics,
critical thinking, and engineering. It requires a sense of narrative, and the
ability to build something. It’s that element of engineering that distinguishes
it from simple analytics, because it builds things that become products, or
processes. Rather than running a report, it improves the report’s results.
If big data is oil, data science is the refinery that makes
it usable.
What is the biggest
challenge in data science and analytics today?

Croll: We are still, sadly, trying to replace opinions with
facts. My good friend Randy Smerik argues that there’s no such thing as big
data: An airline that knows you’re running late fails to update your hotel;
false positives about in credit card management.
His point is that while we have tremendous amounts of data,
we seldom apply them to significantly improve the business or the customer
experience because doing so means making fundamental changes to the organization,
job descriptions, customer policies, and so on.
Where do you see data
science and analytics moving in the next 5 years?

Croll: Democratization, with the help of smart agents.
Pundits have been saying that for a long time, but in the last couple of years
tools like Cortana, Google Now, Siri, and Alexa’as well as various chat
interfaces like Slack, Sophos, and Skype’are going mainstream.
I also think that insurers will put significant pressure on
companies to implement better analytics and algorithms because it will be too
risky to do otherwise. If the organization can know everything about itself all
the time, it will be expected to do so. “We didn’t know this was
happening” will no longer be an excuse. And consequently, algorithms that
can parse all of that data and reduce risk will be mandatory.
Hear more from
Alistair during his keynote session, ‘Don’t’ Get Duped by Data’ at the
Marketing Analytics & Data Science Conference April 3-5, 2017 in San
Francisco, CA.

Data science and marketing analytics are transforming every
industry. There is a reason why it is being called the sexiest job of the 21st
century. Calling all professionals that want to harness analytics and data
science! Do you realize how critical you are to the future of your organization?
Learn more here: https://goo.gl/CbYosj

Use our exclusive
Blog discount code MADS17BL for $100 off the current rate. Buy your tickets
here:
https://goo.gl/CbYosj