Tag Archives: community20

Return on investment for social media

ZD Net recently looked at the return on investment when it comes to social media. They believe that social media will return your investment if you put the proper amount of time into it. They also point out that if you have the proper amount of social media, you can avoid social media disasters. ZD Net cites the most recent social media disaster for United Airlines, United Breaks Guitars.

Do you believe it’s worth investing in social media? As we’ve seen with many companies, United not the first, many PR disasters come about due to social media. Should companies have measures in place to control these events?

Reaching niche markets with social media

AdWeek recently looked at the new niche-market products that are now on the market due to the access that social media provides to these communities. Traditional marketing models put products out there with mass market appeal, but now that social media allows companies to identify and communicate with small markets, new products are rising in popularity. The article uses the line of Gluton Free products which they have marketed almost exclusivly digitally:

“We felt that this was a product that was going to be marketed almost entirely digitally,” said Kelli Ask, interactive-marketing manager at General Mills. “We knew this was a group of very passionate consumers, always talking to each other and looking for solutions.”

Read the full article here.

Does Social Networking Breed Social Division?

Riva Richmond of the NYTimes asks, “Is the social media revolution bringing us together? Or is it perpetuating divisions by race and class?”

The graph above is part of a study done by Eszter Hargittai, an associate professor of communication studies at Northwestern University, who surveyed both 2007 and 2009 first-year college students, ages 18 and 19, at the diverse campus of the University of Illinois at Chicago. Hargittai is interested, among other things, in the socioeconomic differences between Facebook and Myspace. In Hargaittai’s research has “found that Hispanics were much less likely to use Facebook than anyone else and much more likely to use MySpace. Whites, African-Americans and Asian-Americans were all big users of Facebook, with 80 percent or more of each group using it sometimes or often.”

So why the difference? Riva Richmond writes, “Students from less educated families were still more likely to use MySpace, while those from more educated families were more likely to use Facebook. So is this white flight? Yes, but it’s not quite so simple, she (Hargittai) says. Everyone is fleeing MySpace, and whites and Asians are fleeing in larger numbers.”

We encourage you to read Riva Richmond’s piece in its entirety here:

Does Social Networking Breed Social Division?


Eszter Hargittai’s blog

Moms Using Social Media Grows

According to Mike Shields of Progressive Grocer, moms–especially new moms–are flocking to social networking sites. In a report by BabyCenter, moms of young children have reduced their time with magazines and newspapers and converted to the online networking sphere. Shields reports that many times moms have two sets of friends, the online group of peers and their friends and family. “Because these women are so social, and so information hungry, they often meet other mothers in similar child-rearing stages on sites like BabyCenter and all sorts of mommy blogs.”

How can social networking sites cater to new moms?

Small businesses embracing social networking

A new article at the New York Times looks at how small businesses are embracing the networking abilities of social media. Using Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and other smaller niche sites can prove to reach the right people in a timely manner throughout the world. They’re also free. Today, 38% of all small business owners are members of a social networking website, and an estimated 260,000 businesses using social networking to promote themselves. Read about specific businesses and how they’re using tools at the New York Times.

Twitter around the world

Yesterday, we reported the surge in Twitter users due to Oprah’s recent show covering the social media tool. We’ve seen the popularity in the Untied States of Twitter, but how is it faring around the world? Thanks to a few fellow Twitterers, they pointed me in the direction of comScore’s February Twitter stats which also provided the number of Twitter users around the world. They chart is below. It was also intereting that the 18-24 year olds aren’t the core users of this applcation, but instead, it’s more likely that 45-54 year olds are more likely to be Tweeting.

Google now features Twitter in Google Ads

Google is now selling ads featuring tweets. The ad offers the five most recent tweets from a specific account. The first company to jump on board for this is Intuit, who owns tax giant Turbo Tax. They’re trying to increase their Twitter followers as well as add a human aspect to the brand, because they believe that microblogging humanizes the brand.

Seth Greenberg, the director of marketing at Intuit said,
“We could have used this as an acquisition vehicle, but we’re looking at it more like a conversational vehicle. We’re measuring this [in part by] how many followers can we get. Can we get to 100,000 by allowing people to know we’re a resource? We’re not going to hard sell you on the product, but we want people to know there are lots of people here who can help answer your questions.”

Read the full article here.

The False Intimacy of Twitter

by Dawn Lacallade

With a cross between the harsh economy and the surge of new networking tools, the web is a key component of the job hunt. People are using search engines (monster; yahoo, careerbuilder, etc.) as well as networking tools (linkedin, plaxio, twitter, facebook, etc.) With thesetools comes a whole new realm of social norms and rules that we are making up as we go. In the past two weeks, I have had two such interactions that solidified my understanding of one HUGE potential pitfall.

In the first instance the job seeker tweeted generically looking for someone from my company. I responded and we took it offline to a quick call. The applicant was interested in an open position and wanted to gauge the climate here before applying. I completely enjoyed the conversation and thought it might be a strong fit with the company, so I sent my thoughts over with the resume to the hiring VP. This applicant kept the entire exchange fairly formal and very relevant to the position at hand.

The Second person contacted me directly via linked in and asked if we could chat about a position. This person and I have been following each other on twitter within the Social Media Twitter Pack. In the back and forth conversation this applicant went so far to the informal that he actually ended up insulting me while giving me a hard time. In retrospect, I think he had a perceived intimacy because of the twitter relationship that (for me) did not directly translate to a personal relationship. Mye lesson learned was a strong reminder to maintain that professional stance even in these less formal vehicles when you are using them as a direct source of leads on positions.

Anyone else had an experience like this?

Facebook Flirts with Marketers with New Fan Pages

Caroline McCarthy at The Social reports on Facebook’s marketer-savvy fan pages. The pages, which are a nice bridge between direct marketing and profile pages will be revamped today as Mark Zuckerberg and other executives unveil the “new evolution” of fan pages. McCarthy reports, according to a blog post at Advertising Age, the redesigned “fan pages” will look a lot more like regular Facebook profiles, which got their own revamp last year. This means their content will be distributed on tabs, with external applications aggregated primarily on their own tab. Also, according to the AdAge post, activity from fan pages will show up more in members’ news feeds, giving those brands more visibility. Beyond that, we (CNET) don’t have too much more information about what the announcement will entail. So as we wait for this afternoon’s announcement, what do you think will be the success of these fan pages? We’d like to hear your thoughts on Twitter or in our comments section.

Facebook’s “25 Random Things” Phenomenon

By now you may be among the hundreds of thousands who have shared “25 Random Things” about yourself to your Facebook community. The “25″ phenomenon has spread so quickly that now its being picked up by major news organizations. The Washington Post’s online webmag, Slate carried an interesting take on the 25 fad in their piece, “Charles Darwin Tagged You in a Note on Facebook, The evolutionary roots of Facebook’s “25 Things” craze.” Writer Chris Wilson suggests, that the “25 Things” was an evolutionary exercise from the original “16 Things.” States Wilson, “Late last fall, a chain letter titled “16 Random Things About Me” began to chew its way through Facebook. The author of one of these notes would itemize her personality into “16 random things, facts, habits, or goals,” then tag 16 friends who would be prompted to write their own lists. And so on and so on.” Read the rest of his article here. We’d like to hear your thoughts–if not, 25 at a time.