Tag Archives: Cable television

The Impact of Mobile Viewing on Sports Networks

The 2015 College Football Playoffs on New Year’s Day saw the cable TV viewing records be beaten not once, but twice. In fact, 28.271 million viewers (the most of all time) tuned into ESPN to watch the Ohio State Buckeyes defeat the number one seed Alabama Crimson Tide 42-35 in the Sugarbowl. This was preceded by the Oregon Ducks winning 59-20 against the Florida State Seminoles, which received 28.164 million viewers (the second most of all time). These viewing figures had increased by 51 percent and 150 percent, respectively from last year’s games.  
So, with figures like these why do many people believe that TV is dying out? Of course, events such as the College Football Playoffs do not occur every day, however I believe that TV is not dying out, but is simply adapting to the challengers that have recently emerged.
The recent popularity of companies such as Netflix has pushed many major channels to create ways to watch programs and stream live shows online. This has come about in correlation with the advancement of tablet and smartphone technology which now allow you to stream video. Daily media usage for tablets has increased from 21 minutes per day per person to 159 minutes from 2010-2014, smartphones have increased from 40 to 134 minutes, and television only increasing from 269-279 minutes.
ESPNis a prime example of the online charge as 1,728,000 unique viewers used Watch ESPN, its new online stream to watch the Football on New Year’s Day. That huge number of people will have been ESPN subscribers on cable, but were able to watch the game remotely despite not being at home with their cable box via Xbox, laptop, tablets and smartphones.
Despite this surge of online streaming. Bloomberg News discovered that U.S. pay TV subscriptions fell in 2013 from 100.9 million subscriptions to 100.8; not exactly a terrifying statistic for TV companies. Bloomberg’s Ian King points the finger at young people or ‘cord-nevers’ who have never paid for cable or satellite television. These ‘cord-nevers’ are mostly students or young graduates who turn to alternatives such as YouTube, Netflix or Google Play to watch their most loved shows at cheaper prices than a TV subscription.
However, more often than not these people’s families will have television sets; it was found that TV reaches nearly 90 percent of US households. So the recent drive to provide remote online streaming means that these people who may not be able to afford a TV subscription can still watch cable and satellite channels such as ESPN but in different locations. From personal experience, while I was at University in England I was able to watch the FA Cup final live (the English, less glamorous version of the Super Bowl!) while my family watched it at home, instead of having to watch season three of Friends for the ninth time on Netflix.
There is a belief amongst many people that these young ‘cord-nevers’ will continue to use cheaper alternatives as they are used to living without cable TV. I, myself am living in a foreign country on a small budget so television is not a priority, but I believe there will come a time where again I will be able to afford the luxury of satellite TV and I will want to provide it for a family and for them to watch remotely when they themselves can’t afford it.
Understandably, the emergence of cheaper alternatives to watch television shows has caused a decline for cable and satellite TV providers. I believe that the battle for TV domination will continue and TV will have to keep adapting to keep up with the increasingly mobile world but it will not become a thing of the past. People will continue to sit down on New Year’s day to watch Football Playoffs with 28 million other people.
About the Author: Harry Kempe, a marketing intern at IIR USA, who works on various aspects of the industry including social media, marketing analysis and media. He is a recent graduate of Newcastle University who previously worked for EMAP Ltd. and WGSN as a marketing assistant on events such as the World Architecture Festival, World Retail Congress and Global Fashion Awards. He can be reached at hkempe@IIRUSA.com.

NBCUniversal Encourages You to ‘Watch TV without a TV’

Looking to drive interest in its growing TV Everywhere products, NBCUniversal has recently launched a campaign spanning its 14 cable channels. The campaign, ‘Watch TV without a TV,’ will be backed by digital and on-air promos across NBCU’s portfolio and will focus on how consumers can access content across those channels and brands on connected devices as part of their existing TV subscriptions.
According to Multichannel News, the campaign ran from Dec. 26, 2014 through Jan. 1, 2015, and showcased existing TVE apps from NBCU’s lineup, including E! Now; USA Now; NBC Entertainment; NBC News, Bravo Now; CNBC; Esquire Now; Golf Live Extra; MSNBC; NBC Sports Live Extra; Oxygen Now; Sprout Now; Syfy Now, and Telemundo Now. 
The new TVE consumer campaign will be ‘laser focused on driving web traffic, mobile downloads, video views and increased engagement across NBCUniversal’s brands,’ NBCU said. Developed in partnership TBWA/Chiat/Day NY, the campaign will also feature social media components, including the #TVwithoutTHETV Twitter hashtag.
‘NBCUniversal has some of the most iconic brands in TV, so it is only natural that as TV viewing evolves into digital platforms, we as a company continue to expand our strategy, creating broader TV Everywhere options for our consumers,’ said Alison Moore, GM and EVP, TV Everywhere, NBCUniversal, in a statement. ‘With the unyielding support of the company’s vast portfolio of brands, this groundbreaking marketing campaign will heighten consumer awareness of the variety of ways viewers can watch both their beloved favorite shows and exciting new shows across multiple digital platforms right now and on their own time.’  

About the Author: Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs including Next Big DesignCustomers 1stDigital Impact, STEAM Accelerator and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business Analysts, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc.