Tag Archives: Apps

This Week In Market Research: 7/13/15 – 7/17/15

Knowing your consumer is the biggest name of the game for
most companies. So if your employees demographics make up a large percentage of
your consumer base, why not conduct market research internally? This is what
Poshmark, a mobile marketplace for fashion organization, did in giving each employ (over 85 people) apple watches. Around 70% of Pochmark employees are
made up of women who love to shop, according to the founder.  In lieu of launching the Poshmark app, the
move to provide employees with apple watches was motivated by the desire to
gain insight into how women interacted with the new app. After giving the women
time to play around with the app, the results very extremely valuable. Among
many other behaviors noted, the women were extremely happy with the way the app
gave real-time notifications but some individuals were not as drawn to the
amount of images displayed; which could pose an issue for a fashion app that is
driven by images. In general the research was highly educational and showcases
a unique opportunity to conduct market research within the office. 

This week, Google released that it is testing a new feature
that will let consumers purchase products through advertisements. The function,
labeled ‘Purchases on Google’ will allow people using smartphones to ‘click
select search ads to visit retailer-branded product pages hosted by google.’
Going up against competition from companies like Amazon, Google is beginning to
invest in ways that attract the mobile shopper. ‘Thanks to smartphones,
shopping now happens anytime and anywhere,’ a spokesperson from the company
stated. It will be interesting to see where this function takes off from here
and how users will interact with it. 

You’ve seen it everywhere on Facebook: ‘Win free Chipotle
for a year!!’ Like who doesn’t want free Mexican fast food for the next year!?
So why is this irresistibly delicious fact food chain offering free chipotle
for a year and what do they want in return? Well, as it turns out, Chiptotle
just released its own app called, ‘Friend or Faux.’ In order to build more of
an awareness and audience on the app they’re offering a buy one get one free
coupon for anyone who plays the game. On top of that, 50 fortunate players will
be randomly selected to win free chipotle for themselves and a friend for an
entire year. In order to increase your chances of winning, each participant is
encouraged to tweet about ‘Friend or Faux.’ Essentially the game is another way
to highlight that Chipotle tops any other traditional fast food chain as far as
health goes. This campaign carries a brilliant strategy in order to gain more
app attention while also building up the reputation and brand of Chipotle.  

 

Nichole Dicharry,
is a Digital Marketing Assistant at IIR USA, Marketing and Finance Divisions, who
works on various aspects of the industry including social media, marketing
analysis and media. She can be reached at Ndicharry@iirusa.com 
 

Hacking H(app)iness Reveals Quantified (Whole) Self

Consumer Devices and Apps May Unlock Door to Measuring Unconscious Emotions

By
Marc Dresner, IIR
John Havens is on to something
that marketers and consumer researchers should pay close attention to, because
the implications for insights work are huge.
This trend gets to the very essence of consumer intelligence and it may be the wave of the future…only it’s happening now.
John Havens
The research isn’t
being conducted by consumer researchers; this research is being conducted by
consumers, themselves, for themselves.
Havens’author of ‘Hacking H(app)iness:
Why Your Personal Data Counts and How Tracking
it Can Change the World’ and founder of the H(app)athon Project–is on a
mission to help people objectively take
stock of their lives using data they collect about themselves, and to then adjust
their behaviors, lifestyles and priorities according to what those data tell
them.
‘Hacking H(app)iness involves using the devices and
technologies we interact with every day to track, understand and
optimize every aspect of our lives’
‘Hacking H(app)iness involves using the devices and technologies around
us that we interact with every day to track, understand and
optimize every aspect of our lives,’ Havens said.
‘We don’t always know how we are feeling,’ Havens remarked. 
‘The data we can collect about ourselves on our smartphones, using apps and through other devices can serve as a proxy for our emotions and help us to improve our overall ‘wellbeing’ and quality of life,’ he added.
‘We don’t always know how we are feeling’Data
we can collect about ourselves on smartphones using apps can serve as a proxy
for our emotions.’
It’s based on the science of
positive psychology. After all, Havens is about hacking happiness, not misery’a thoroughly noble pursuit to be sure.
But after conducting an
interview with Havens for the Research Insighter podcast series, yours truly
has honestly been preoccupied with the potential applications and implications
for consumer researchers.
So I hope you’ll  forgive me
if I focus less attention than I should on the potential benefit to mankind and
more on the possibility that consumers may figure out a way to harness Big Data
before those of us in marketing do.
Self Improvement…Gamified?

You’re probably familiar
with the ‘Quantified Self’ movement taking the healthcare and wellness
industries by storm.
It’s generally associated
with using sensor technology in smartphones and wearable devices (think Fitbit)
to track and analyze physiological and other health-related data: heart rate,
blood pressure, exercise, etc.
Now, ‘quantified
selfies’ will tell you that monitoring one’s own blood pressure, pulse and the
like barely scratches the surface of the quantified self movement.
And they’re right.
The Quantified Self movement is in many respects the gamification of self improvement.

In many respects, the Quantified Self movement this is the
gamification of self improvement.
Some devotees’there are clubs
of them sprouting up all over (New York has a ‘chapter’)’monitor their
cognitive functioning, blood oxygen levels’even the quality of the very air in
the room they’re breathing.
And they don’t stop there.
Want to know how well you
sleep at night? You need not necessarily spend a night in a medical sleep
center; you can do it yourself at home in your own bed without a bunch of
clinicians watching you thrash around in your sheets from behind glass.
Not all of these data are
passively collected.
What you ate for lunch, for
example, and its nutritional content needs to be manually entered, but that’ll
get easier fast. (Watch for barcodes next to menu items in restaurants that can
be scanned to your smartphone to track your diet.)
Technology that was only accessible to healthcare professionals, the
military, law enforcement, etc., is now becoming commercially available to everyday consumers.
The point is that much of
this, Havens points out, is possible because technology that was until recently
only accessible to healthcare professionals, the military, law enforcement,
etc., is now becoming commercially available to everyday consumers.
For example, he noted there’s
an app available for download that accurately reads your heart rate by just pointing
your smartphone’s camera at your face.
‘These
devices don’t even have to be touching
us to collect this data,’ Havens emphasized.
This type of stuff was
formerly the domain of agents scoping out potential terrorists in airports.
And there are other equally
sophisticated, albeit less sexy data collection technologies that are also
making their way into the hands of everyday folks.
DIY online tracking? The data collection and analytics tools marketers
use are making their way into the hands of average folks.
I’m talking about the data
collection and analytics tools marketers use.
Think do-it-yourself online tracking’the
activity, time spent, sites visited, Google searches, etc.
What could this information
tell us about ourselves?
I recently attended IIR’s
Media Insights and Engagement conference’a sister event to the Future of Consumer Intelligence, which sponsors this blog’and I can tell you media
researchers are quite keen on getting at cross-platform media consumption data
(not just programming content, but social and any other “media,” too’all of it).
Meanwhile, Havens in his
book proposes that you and I’wearing our Joe Consumer hats’might benefit from looking
at how much time we spend playing Candy Crush, streaming YouTube videos,
Facebooking, listening to MP3s, bidding on eBay auctions, etc.
Now where am I going to get
that data?
My smartphone,
my tablet, my desktop computer…Eureka!
So what would I do with this information?
H(app)iness
hacking is like looking at a monthly credit card statement…You can see what you truly value based on where you spent your money.
Havens compares it to
looking at one’s monthly credit card statement (something else I happen to have
access to, coincidentally).
‘With
a credit card statement, you can see what you truly value because there is a list of
what you put your money toward in the past month,’ he told the Research
Insighter.
Similarly,
you know you really like music if you see that you’ve downloaded a ton of it.
Or
maybe it’s a lot of pornography that you’ve been downloading?
That’s
where the positive change comes into play.
‘If
you ask someone what really matters to them in life, they’ll tell you things
like family time,’ said Havens.
‘But
what if you had objective data about how you live your life? If you could track
the things that you claim’that you believe’are important to you’? he asked.
If you could track the things that you believe are important to you, on paper the actual data might suggest otherwise.
‘We
might find that actually, according to the data, we don’t really value those
things’at least that’s how it looks on paper. And we can make a change,’ Havens said.
I’m not going to suggest
that this stuff is going to make online surveys look primitive, like leaching’but
you must admit Havens has a point.
Self-reported behavior isn’t
bullet proof. 
And self-reported feelings? 

So much attention and investment is
being devoted to unlocking the unconscious emotional motivations that drive consumer
behavior in the research community for good reason.

‘My hope is that these tools
will allow people the opportunity to improve their wellbeing by making
decisions based on real data, knowing things about themselves that they might not otherwise be
aware of,’ said Havens.
Now tell me the research
community shouldn’t pay attention to this.


And click these links to check
out John Havens’ book, ‘Hacking H(app)iness,’ and to learn more about the
H(app)athon Project.
Editor’s note: John Havens will deliver a keynote titled, ‘Hacking
Happiness: How to Give Big Data a Direction’ at the Future of Consumer Intelligence conference taking place May
19-21 in San Francisco.

As a reader of this blog you will SAVE 15% on
your registration to attend the Future of Consumer Intelligence when you use
code FOCI14BLOG.  Register here today!


For more information, please visit www.futureofconsumerintel.com


ABOUT THE AUTHOR / INTERVIEWER 
Marc Dresner is IIR USA’s sr. editor and special communication project lead. He is the former executive editor of Research Business Report, a confidential newsletter for the marketing research and consumer insights industry. He may be reached at mdresner@iirusa.com. Follow him @mdrezz.

Exclusive Interview: Stephen Gates, Senior Creative Director, Starwood Hotels & Resorts

Stephen Gates, Senior Creative Director, Starwood Hotels & Resorts recently spoke at The Mobile Marketing Conference on Best Practices for Creating Mobile Websites.

We caught up with him to chat about the future of mobile marketing, Starwood’s mobile strategy, and advice for those just starting out. One exciting development from Starwood? The new Starwood Preferred Guest app, which offers an intuitive experience that’s perfect for frenzied travelers. According to this review on MediaPost:

The new app, which is actually Starwood’s third-generation mobile app, includes things like FaceTime integration — a first for any company (that isn’t Apple.) The app also includes fully integrated booking, member information, comprehensive hotel searches and travel details, customer service and social media.

Gates spoke of the app experience saying “we don’t want to create dumb experiences for smart devices.” To learn more, watch our video below:

Want to stay up to date on Mobile Marketing news? Follow us on twitter or Facebook.

Michelle LeBlanc is a Social Media Strategist at IIR USA with a specialization in marketing. She may be reached at mleblanc@iirusa.com 

Live at #TMMC: Strategies to Measuring Mobile Impact on the Bottom Line

Up next at The Mobile Marketing Conference was Thomas Poole, Managing Vice President, Digital Mobile & Emerging Channels, Capital One Financial Corp.

Poole started us off with the fact that one smartphone has more computing power than 100 Atari 800s, modern smartphones are cloud connected “super computers” and we have them with us 24/7.

This mobile connectivity allows for improved customer experiences, one great example of this? Mobile banking check deposits. From having to go to a bank branch, to maybe visiting the bank at the grocery store, to now being able to deposit a check via mobile phone a huge consumer pain point has been solved.

Another good example of improved customer experiences through mobile? The Starbucks app that builds loyalty through integrated rewards. Square Card Case and Shopkick are other good examples of using technology such as geo-location services and gamification to build customer interactions. Foodspotting was another app mentioned as an example of an app that uses the real-life context of users. What all these apps have in common is more data with less friction.

Poole left us with three pieces of advice:
Stay Connected (Use resources, try out apps and devices, read up on trends)
Be Nimble (Employ Agile Methodologies, act like you’re in the software business)
Copy Shamelessly (Take advantage of the insights that you see)

Creating Value For Your Customers Through Mobile

If there’s one consistent theme that we hear when it comes to mobile, it’s that unwanted mobile marketing can feel intrusive, or be viewed as spam, whereas the right mobile content at the right time can be extremely effective. When you are providing real value to your customers through your mobile content it builds loyalty and engagement.

The HealtheHorizons’ visioncheck app, which is available free on iTunes right now, is a perfect example of providing such value. As part of Allergan’s HealtheHorizons’ wellness programs, the app is a unique application for screening three common eye diseases in diabetics. Targeted at active individuals with limited time and desire to see a doctor, the app provides quick, useful vision tests, and more information on common questions and concerns, it also further encourages one to contact an eye care professional. This video explains further:

Mark S. Miller, Director of Marketing ‘ Channel Strategy, Allergan , Inc. will be speaking on this topic more at the upcoming Mobile Marketing Conference in Miami.

At his session, you’ll learn:
‘ How Allergan leveraged apps and tablets to build disease awareness and education
‘ Key drivers impacting consumer decisions
‘ How mobile can save time and money

Save 15% when you register with code TMMC12DIGITAL here.

P.S. Join our social media community! Our new LinkedIn Group is a place to share expertise and brilliant ideas on anything mobile marketing and you can also follow us on Twitter or on Facebook for conference updates and industry insider news.

News Roundup: One Month Til Mobile & Some Sweet Digital Campaigns

Going forward in 2012 we’d like to provide you with occasional roundups of some of our favorite finds.

This week on the blog, we had a great guest post by TMMC speaker Darin Wonn, we celebrated New York Fashion Week by looking at L’Oreal’s Redken mobile marketing, and we got excited about some of the top brands that will be at next month’s conference.

Elsewhere, the world celebrated Valentine’s Day in a very mobile way, from mobile searches for restaurants and florists (62% mobile!) to AR magic at Starbucks. According to brandchannel:

“One quarter of smartphone owners will research and compare products on their phone, one in ten will make purchases and redeem coupons, and one in five will be looking up on the spot information like location and store hours. One-third of tablet owners will research products and compare prices, and one in five anticipates actually purchasing their gifts on the device.”

Given that mobile purchases are predicted to total $119 billion globally by 2015, and “The Number Of Mobile Devices Will Exceed World’s Population By 2012,” it’s only natural that brands are flocking to the medium, but AdWeek took a moment to wonder “Do Mobile Ads Still Suck?

When it comes to the platforms that are making the mobile web so popular, Ford Fiesta introduced an Instagram campaign via Facebook and up-and-comer Pinterest continued to generate a lot of buzz, from questions of copyright, to some helpful dos and don’ts for brands. Additionally, Facebook announced that we can look forward to Timeline for brands later this month and Mashable rounded up some of the top brand pages on Google+.

Is your company pursuing any new digital strategies? What platforms or mediums are you looking at?

Like these updates? You can also follow us on Twitter or on Facebook for conference updates and industry insider news all week long.

Smartphones: A Perfect Way to Reach Stranded Travelers

IHG’s Holiday Inn Express iPhone App

Mobile is a booming channel for travel companies. For my company, Intercontinental Hotels Group (IHG), annual gross mobile booking revenue has risen from $2.5 million in 2009 to over $130 million in 2011. Most importantly, it is letting travel companies reach a new segment of customers: same-day bookers, those that are buying transportation and travel lodging the same day that they are going to use it.

Same day bookings account for nearly 65% of the bookings that are made on the InterContinental Hotels Group mobile apps and mobile websites and other travel companies are reporting similar numbers through their mobile products. In contrast, same-day customers only account for a small percentage of bookings made on desktop websites. A large portion of these same-day customers are likely stranded travelers. Travel companies can now reach these stranded travelers through their smartphones using mobile apps and mobile websites in order to turn the anxiety of being stranded in an unfamiliar location into a positive experience, resulting in revenue and great impression of the travel company.

IHG has developed some best practices for how we approach crafting apps and mobile websites that willl meet the needs of stranded travelers:

  •           Focus on 2 to 3 Core Tasks

    Smartphones dont have the large amounts of screenspace that a desktop computer has, travel companies must decide on the 2 to 3 most important tasks for the stranded traveler and focus on delivering those.

  • Empathize With the Stranded Traveler
    The best way to decide what those 2 to 3 tasks are is to walk in the shoes of a stranded traveler. On your next trip (if you’re brave enough), wait until you land at the airport to make a hotel reservation. What information do you need to make the booking and what are the pain points?

  • Make the Purchase Path FAST and EASY
    Travelers will have their hands full of luggage and tired children. They will be rushing to find a hotel room before the last shuttle leaves the airport. They may be in foreign territory with spotty or expensive data connectivity. The purchase process must be highly streamlined or customers will abandon the purchase. IHG’s mobile apps open directly to a map of nearby hotels with prices for that night.
  • Don’t Forget the Post-Purchase Experience
    The strength of the smartphone is it goes with the traveler once the booking is made. How can it assist in not only booking, but every aspect of the travel experience. For example, provide real-time driving directions from the user’s current location to the hotel.

The opportunities for travel companies to reach stranded travelers is growing fast and the risk of frustrating an already frustrated user is high, but if travel companies start with these basic guidelines to drive their mobile apps and websites then the end result should be positive travel experiences for their customers.

Darin Wonn is Product Manager for Mobile Apps at InterContinental Hotels Group. Follow him on twitter @darinwonn.

To hear more about IHG’s work in the mobile marketing space, join us this March at The Mobile Marketing Conference. Darin will be speaking on The Mobile Traveler on Tuesday, March 20th, 2012. Download the brochure here to learn more.


News Round-up: 2011 milestones and 2012 Tech Trends

Going forward in 2012 we’d like to provide you with some occasional round-ups of some of our favorite finds from around the internet.

This week was full of treasures, first of all one of our favorite resources for inspiration Design Mind by Frog Design released their 2012 Tech Trend Predictions. Check out the slideshow below, or head over to their blog for more in-depth info. Our favorite trends? “Connected Cities” – or the increased convergence of the digital with the physical and local – and “The Reductive Social Network: Technology Finally Gets Personal,” which explores the ways we will narrow our ever-increasing social circles.

Also of interest, The Barbarian Group launched this infographic of 2011 social media milestones. It’s amazing to look back and see how far we’ve come in the past year.

We’ve been closely following the development of Pinterest lately, as more and more sources are buzzing about the new network. Mashable announced this week that Pinterest is amongst the 60 new apps that have been added. If you’re thinking about using Pinterest for business, be sure to check out “Pinterest: A Dream-catcher for Creatives & CEOs” on the Front End of Innovation blog.

Lastly, from the world of Mobile,  a new App, “ReconAge” allows Android phones to be able to judge the age of their users. While this could provide valuable data to marketers, it’s unclear if users would opt in to using the program. Meanwhile, in India, mobile users are now able to download apps via a store at the mall. This post on Fast Company provides more insight into the new world of “Connected Consumers.”

What were your favorite digital marketing links this week? What resources do you turn to?

How will the new Facebook changes change your strategy?

Facebook changing out it’s layout without warning to users has happened so many times now that it has become the butt of jokes. But what will the new Facebook changes mean for you and for your brand?

Under pressure from Google+, Facebook has rolled out some serious changes, including new privacy features such as being able to view your profile as anyone and enhanced friend list. The new news feed and introduction of the ticker add an additional layer of change.

To top that off, soon we will be seeing the “Timeline

So what do all these changes mean for brands using Facebook to market? All Facebook wonders: “Will pages be able to reach their fans? Will it be worthwhile to spend ad money to build fan bases?”

And the answer is, it may. As it is currently, it appears that Facebook’s new feed will be prioritizing posts that have a high engagement rate, fan pages with low engagement may have even more trouble reaching fans.

Perhaps the most important change to pay attention to is the introduction of GraphRank. As a part of EdgeRank, this new feature will primarily effect App usage. According to AllThingsD “Social discovery of apps is seen as the next frontier in solving the troublesome problem of finding useful and relevant programs from among hundreds of thousands of choices.”

So what do you think of the new Facebook? Are you looking forward to Timeline? Are you considering joining the ranks of Facebook App developers? Let us know.

Michelle LeBlanc is a Social Media Strategist at IIR USA with a specialization in marketing. She may be reached at mleblanc@iirusa.com

Smartphone Apps to Triple by 2014

Vikrant Gandhi, analyst at market research firm Frost & Sullivan and author of “An Insight into the U.S. Smartphone Application Storefront Market,” recently told InternetNews.com that the amount of smartphone apps will triple in 2014.

PDAStreet reports that downloads from all app stores will reach 6.67 billion applications by 2014, up from two billion this year. Downloads from all app stores will reach 6.67 billion applications by 2014, up from two billion this year.

Gandhi said the following factors are fueling the download app growth: free content subsidized by mobile advertising and mobile commerce; high-quality user experiences driven by next-generation devices and advanced networks; strong support from key industry players; the vast inventory of apps appealing to a broad and diversified segment of users; and operator acceptance.

Get the full story here at InternetNews.com and PDAStreet.com