Tag Archives: Advertising

Insights Interview: Q&A with Diane Powell, Conagra Brands

We sat down with OmniShopper
speaker Diana Powell who is a Shopper Insights Manager at Conagra Brands, to
discuss how retail is being disrupted.
How has retail been
disrupted?
 
Powell: In the
food industry, traditional grocers are experiencing competition no longer just
from other grocers, but from emerging channels of meal sourcing such as
subscriptions, meal kits, offline and online wholesale/club stores, and
hundreds of new delivery models.  Traditional brick and mortar stores are
having to rethink how they do retail ‘ with more ready-to-go options and
elevating the shopping experience to draw shoppers in.
How has omnichannel
impacted retail positively?
 
Powell: We’ve
been keeping a close eye on ecommerce and how it impacts shopping for
food.  Shoppers view online shopping as complementary to their in-store
experience and most don’t foresee it replacing all in-store.  Shoppers who
are buying groceries in store AND online spend more overall than in-store only
shoppers.
How is this new era
of shopping everywhere impacting shopper insights? 
Powell: We must
be ahead of the digital transformation to keep up with where shoppers
are.  It’s not enough to just send the same old surveys to mobile phones,
but we must find new ways to use cutting age big data to understand online
behaviors that consumers don’t even know they are doing. Also, with the IoT,
behavior and trends change faster than ever, so we need to update research and
findings more frequently as to not lag in our reporting.
Additionally, in the food industry, we’ve also traditionally
spent our time researching women. However, with equal proportions of men
and women millennials doing the grocery shopping, we can’t have blinders to
both genders!
How are shoppers
shaping the future of retail?
Powell: In food
ecommerce, there is a clash between the shopper’s perspective of value and the
retailers when it comes to ecommerce.  Shoppers are used to shopping
online for other categories (electronics, clothing, housewares, cleaning
supplies, etc.) and when they shop online for these products, they are
expecting to get great deals.  They have cost comparison sites and aps at
their fingertips and are quick and savvy deal shoppers.  They apply this
same thinking to their online grocery shopping and expect to find good prices
and deals. 
However, food retailers think that because of the
convenience of online grocery shopping, shoppers should be paying a
premium.  They charge fees for pickup and delivery, charge higher prices
for the same products, don’t integrate as many couponing options, and some even
ask for a tip for the person delivering.  Shoppers are not willing to pay
such a premium (only about $5) and therefore I don’t think we’re seeing the
shift as quickly as it’s happened for other goods.  It will be fascinating
to see how sites like Jet.com and amazon, which are modeled to give shoppers
great prices, will force the traditional brick-and-mortar- e-tailers to step up
their price savings game.
Why is it important
to link digital and physical shopper marketing? 
Powell: Even when
shoppers are in a physical store, they are connected digitally.  Whether
they are using their devices for shopping related activities or not depends on
the minute! A buzz from their purse or pocket triggers a look, a distraction
from the shelf, but also an opportunity to influence.  Of course, we must
be mindful of respecting the shopper’s desires for how often/what we contact
them about ‘ making sure to give the appropriate value exchange customized to
that shopper.
Where do you see retail moving in the next 5 years?
 I’m excited to see a nice balance of the tangible and intangible.  I
think retail shopping will become more immersive, experiential, and
destination-based.  Offering the benefits that are near impossible to
recreate. Perhaps even more analog, more customized. People have a
desire to disconnect sometimes, and to return to the simple. Or on the contrary,
offering high tech in-person experiences that aren’t possible in your own home
is also going to happen.  I’m also excited to see the continuation of the
tech explosion ‘ with voice search leading the way for a lot of cool
innovation.  Deliveries will be faster, subscriptions will grow, and brand
loyalty may make a comeback when shoppers spend more time speaking to their
devices versus searching through.

Don’t miss Powell’s
session, ‘Knowledge
is Power, If You Can Find It!’
on June 20th at 3:40 PM in
Minneapolis, MN. Use code OMNI17BL for $100 off the current rate:
https://goo.gl/XY25DW

Introducing the TMRE On Demand Webinar Series!

Introducing the TMRE On Demand Webinar
Series!

TMRE ON DEMAND
As insights leaders, we are
constantly tasked with evolving our skill sets and staying on top of the latest
MR trends.
The producers of TMRE: The Market
Research event are excited to announce that we’ll be delivering the
cutting-edge content and speakers to keep you informed year-round. The TMRE
webinar series takes you beyond the in-person event, and is designed for executives
with a relentless focus on securing the future of insights as a powerful force
for business success. Each quarter, the TMRE Webinar series delivers a 3-part
webinar experience designed to empower insights executives with the latest
information around hot topics to ensure insights drives bottom line impact.
Schedule of WEBINARS:
STORYTELLING WITH DATA
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 ‘ 2:00 ‘ 3:30 PM EST
Driving the
value of insights forward requires much more than just unearthing great data.
You need to use that data to tell a story and command influence across the
broader organization. Because storytelling may not be an inherent skill, this
3-part webinar focuses on how to use data to create an engaging, informative, compelling story. 
               
THE NEED FOR SPEED: BALANCING SPEED OF
INSIGHT WITH QUALITY OF INSIGHTS
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 – 2:00 – 3:30 PM
EST
There is a constant tug of war within
insights and research departments. Your internal end-users want things done
quickly and cheaply. While career market researches want to ensure they are
using the savviest tools and techniques, and not just will get the job done
first. This 3-part webinar focuses on how to balance speed and quality.
DEMYSTIFYING THE MILLENNIAL MINDSET
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 ‘ 2:00 ‘ 3:30 PM
EST
Millennials are currently the
largest purchasing base, but remain one of the biggest mysteries for companies
looking to understand the ‘why’ behind their actions and anticipate future
needs. This 3-part webinar focuses on MR in the on-demand mindset and generate
impactful insights that create brands/products around a purpose that speaks to
millennials.

Insights Interview: James Petretti, SVP, Research & Analytics, Sony Pictures TV

In our recent insights interview, we sat down with James Petretti,
Senior Vice President, U.S. Research and Analytics to discuss how to reach the new
age media consumer.
Here’s what Petretti had to say:
What is the state of
the media research industry in 2017?
Petretti: Media Research is more complicated than ever
before ‘ more platforms, more channels, more kinds of content and more measures
than ever before ‘ the different types of data sets, and sheer amount of it
that  we are required to work with today means we need to bring in new
skill sets and core competencies ‘ so it’s a constant learning process on top
of trying to stay on top of an ever-increasing amount of information’ it’s exhilarating
and exhausting at the same time.
What have been the
biggest changes in the industry since you started your career?
Petretti: We’ve
moved from an analog to digital world ‘ that’s changed everything.
Have the influx of
social media and mobile made your job easier or harder?
Petretti: Both ‘
there’s more data to have to consider ‘ but it’s often a rich data set that
allows us to have immediate feedback
How has the media
consumer changed in the past few years?
Petretti: The
Consumer is King today’ they’re in control
How can media
companies do a better job reaching the new age consumer?
Petretti: We need
to make sure we respect the consumer today ‘ when Media was a one to many
medium, media companies were driving the relationship ‘ but that’s changed and
we must respond in kind ‘ we can’t just look at consumers as ‘audience targets’
‘ we must understand them as individuals and consider how we can help satisfy
their needs and expectations.
What is the biggest
challenge in the media industry today?
Petretti: The
Business Model has not yet evolved to meet today’s realities ‘ the ad supported
television model is based on a captive audience trapped in linear time ‘ but
today viewers are liberated with extraordinary options that empower individual
control and increasingly asynchronous viewing.
Where do you see
media research moving in 5 years?

Petretti: Analytics,
Data Science and Data Visualization continue to become increasingly important
disciplines for media researchers ‘ we need to incorporate core competencies
from each to meet the demands of the new media world today and beyond.

Meet the Powerful Women Driving the Future of Customer Insights

TMRE: The Market Research Event and OmniShopper have some
exciting news to share’
Not only is TMRE partnering with WiRE (Women in Research)
for the first annual TMRE/WiRE Women in Research Award to celebrate some true
rock-star researchers, but we’re happy to share a preliminary list of powerful
women in insights confirmed to take the stage at both the TMRE and OmniShopper 2017
events.

Check out the inspiring women speaking at TMRE 2017:


??        
Dawn Cunningham, Chief Insights Officer, 3M
??        
Amber Case, Cyborg Anthropologist, Author, Calm
Technology
??        
Cole Nussbaum Knaffic, Founder, Storytelling
with Data
??        
Kristin Luck, Founder, WiRE: Women in Research
??        
Marina Kosten, VP Research – International
Theatrical, 20th Century Fox
??        
Elizabeth Merrick May, Head of Customer
Insights, Nest
??        
Christina Jenkins, Director, Global Business
Marketing, North America, Twitter
??        
Anna Fieler, Chief Marketing Officer, Popsugar
??        
Lisa Courtade, Head of Market Research, Merck
??        
Judy Melanson, SVP, Travel & Entertainment,
Chadwick Martin Bailey
??        
Amanda Hill, Chief Marketing Officer, A+E
Networks
??        
Margo Arton, Director of Ad Effectiveness
Research, Buzzfeed
??        
Lauren Zweifler, Senior Vice President
,Strategic Insights & Research, NBCUniversal
??        
Terrae Schroeder, Senior Director, Wholesome
& Shopper Insights, NA Snacks, Kellogg
??        
Theresa Pepe, VP of Research, Viacom
??        
Sarita Bhagwat, Vice President, Market
Intelligence, Fidelity Investments
??        
Julie Brown, President, The Center for Strategy
Research
??        
Lori Tarabeck, Global Market Insights, Abbott
Diabetes Care
??        
Renata Polcicio, Vice President, Fan and Media
Intelligence, International, Global Markets, ESPN
??        
Jennifer Avery, Director, Consumer Insights,
Universal Orlando Resort
??        
Sara Fahim, Senior Research & Innovation
Consultant, Seek Company
??        
Tiffany Sanders, Business Intelligence &
Research, CBS
??        
Emily Akinson, Insights & Planning, Consumer
& Market Insights, Kellogg
??        
Mary Beth Jowers, Consumer Insights Lead for
North, Central and Eastern Europe, Gruppo Campari
??        
Stephanie Cunningham, Senior Manager, Customer
Insights & Analytics, eBay
??        
Lina Roncancio, Insights & Innovation
Director, Discovery Communications Latin America
??        
Michelle Gansle, Director, Consumer & Market
Insights, Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company
??        
Karin Kricorian, Director, Management Science
and Integration, Disney
??        
Sarah Beachler, Director, Market Research &
Client Insights, Sephora
??        
Beth Coleman, SVP Marketing and Partner
Insights, Viacom
??        
Samantha Dawkins, Vice President, Client
Strategy & Advocacy, ADP
??        
Gabriela McCoy, Director of Global Consumer
Insights, Bacardi
??        
Kassie Deng, Director, Marketing & Partner
Insights, Viacom
??        
Lyndsey Albertson, Director of Sales Research,
ABC
??        
Maria Cristina Antonio, Director, Metabolic
Insights & Analytics, Novo Nordisk
??        
Julia Oswald, Senior Vice President, Strategy
& Insights, Domino’s Pizza
??        
Carley Metsker, Vice President, Client Service,
Directions Research
??        
Monika Mandrakas, Market Researcher &
Customer Advocate, Mutual of Omaha
View the TMRE brochure
for a full list of speakers:
https://goo.gl/1Ricj2
Check out the inspiring women speaking at OmniShopper 2017:

??        
Shopper Marketing Activations: Marketing &
Merchandising: J Lynn Martinez, Vice President & Team Lead Kroger, Dr
Pepper Snapple Group
??        
Customer Experience Design: How Research &
Design Collaborate to Build New and Differentiated Experiences: Kate Kompelien,
Customer Experience – Center for Excellence for Research & Strategy, Best
Buy
??        
Omnichannel Customer Analysis: Lakshmi
Venkataramari, Senior Director, Customer Insights & Analytics, Walmart
eCommerce
??        
Winning in Her Purse: Kelley Styring, Principal,
InsightFarm
??        
Knowledge is Power, If You Can Find It: Ashley
Starke & Diana Powell, Manager, Shopper Insights, ConAgra Foods
??        
Team Structure Doesn’t Matter: Sue Butler, Director
of Omnichannel Insights, Walmart
??        
Going Beyond Behavior to Drive Category Growth:
Monica Melichar, Senior Manager, Consumer Insights, Beam Suntory & Erin
Barber, Senior Vice President, C+R Research
??        
Longitudinal Data & the Low Purchase
Frequency Category: Stacy Carty, Shopper Insights, Samsung
??        
Driving Change While Driving the Business:
Improving Tools & Automation: Theresa Hendrickson, Director, eCommerce
Engineering – Business Tools & Processes, Best Buy
View the OmniShopper
Brochure for a full list of speakers: https://goo.gl/Qw8Juo
Use exclusive
LinkedIn discount code TMRE17LI for $100 off the current rate. Buy tickets to
TMRE now:
https://goo.gl/1Ricj2
Use exclusive
LinkedIn discount code OMNI17LI for $100 off the current rate. Buy tickets to
OmniShopper now:
https://goo.gl/Qw8Juo
Also, don’t miss our
upcoming free webinar ‘Storytelling with Data’ http://bit.ly/2o0bpAS
featuring speakers Kelsy Saulsbury, Manager, Consumer Insight & Analytics,
Schwan’s Shared Services, LLC and Bill Greenwald, Founder and Chief
Neuroleaderologist, Windsor Leadership Group, LLC. 
Driving the value of
insights forward requires much more than just unearthing great data. You need
to use that data to tell a story and command influence across the broader
organization. Because storytelling may not be an inherent skill, this webinar
focuses on how to use data to create an engaging, informative, compelling
story.  Register for the webinar here:
http://bit.ly/2o0bpAS
Cheers,
The TMRE & OmniShopper Teams
@TMRE
@OmniShopper

Here Comes Gen Z: 10 Keys to Understanding Them

According to Open Mind Strategy
research, these are the top things to know about the new kids on the block Gen
Z:
1. Huge
Gen Zs make up more than
a third of the world’s population and comprise nearly a quarter of the US
population ‘ bigger than both Millennials and Baby Boomers ‘ and still being
born.
2. The most diverse
generation ever
Gen Z will be the last
majority-White generation born in the United States. Already the white majority
is holding on by a thread, only 51% of Gen Z born into non-Hispanic White
families.
This generation’s
diversity also extends to their sexuality and gender identity. More than
one-third of Gen Zs self-identify as bisexual to some degree; more than half
know someone who uses gender-neutral pronouns.
3. They idolize
Influencers, not Celebrities
Most dedicate more time
to YouTube than any other social site and their view of celebrities isn’t limited
to movie stars and musicians, note the billions of views racked up by YouTube
stars RayWilliamJohnson and PewDiePie. They want to emulate self-made
Influencers who are just like them.
4. A plan to get paid
While Gen Zs are
certainly passion-driven, if they know their passions won’t lead to financial
stability, they have a plan for something that will. In everything from
entrepreneurship to sports, kids and teens are finding places to excel early
and focus their efforts in hopes of a payoff.
5. Having safe fun
Gen Zs are still
teenagers! They want to have a good time, but they don’t want to negatively
impact the successful future they are working to build. The teen pregnancy and
birth rate are at historic lows, as is the usage of cigarettes and heroin among
high-schoolers.
6. Caring about ‘cool’
Gen Z is snarky and very
image aware. With the ever-growing influence of social media, there is a
palpable return of ‘cool kids’ and ‘losers’ among Gen Z. They will quickly take
down a post that doesn’t receive enough likes for fear of someone seeing its
lack of attention.
7. Don’t share
everything online
Gen Z takes a crafted
and curated approach to posts. They are more aware of who they are sharing
their lives with and how it affects their identity, which is why platforms like
Snapchat are so appealing. They saw the devastating effects party pics had on
their sibling’s scholarship or job offer.
8. No Mo ‘Beta Boys’
Gen Z boys want to be
taken more seriously. To them, girls are certainly equal, but not better.
Gen Z boys want in on the partnership by taking themselves a bit more seriously
in school, work and relationships, but also embracing their sensitive side.
9. Mostly cynical
Gen Zs have realistic
expectations and are skeptical that the world will work in their favor. More
than eight in 10 Gen Zs were born after September 11. Growing up, conflicts
over issues like the economy, gun violence and climate change, have been
common. As a result, these teens have developed a valid claim to cynicism.
10. Still KIDS!
This generation is just
beginning to come of age, and as uptight as they may seem, they’re still kids
who haven’t quite figured it all out yet. They’re working hard and taking
themselves seriously, but they are still silly, young, fun and undeclared.
END
Open Mind Strategy, LLC, is a research and
brand strategy firm founded by Robin Hafitz, in 2010, with the mission of
providing ‘more human intelligence.’ OMS
(http://www.openmindstrategy.com/) provides
insight services, including qualitative and quantitative research, brand
studies, show and message testing, segmentation, and customized inquiries, as
well as strategic brand consulting and educational workshops. The O
MS
team is proud to have worked with leading clients, such as A&E Networks,
AMC, Amazon, Clear Channel, Cond?? Nast, Gannett, Kao Brands, MTV, NBCUniversal,
Scripps Networks, Unilever, USA Today, Yahoo!, and many more.

Online Ad Effectiveness Research Grows Up

 This article is
brought to you by Survata.

The days of giving
digital a pass are over. It’s time to grow up.’- Marc
Pritchard, Chief Branding Officer, Procter & Gamble, January 2017
When the CBO of P&G tells us to grow up,
we listen. And after speaking with clients at last month’s Media Insights
Conference, it’s clear that there’s consensus: online advertising research
needs to get more sophisticated.
We’re here to help. IAB breaks research down into phases: design, recruitment & deployment, and
optimization. We’ll walk through each phase and determine what’s most in need
of ‘growing up.’ We’ll also include questions to ask your research partner to
help increase the sophistication of your ad effectiveness research.
Design

Let’s start by acknowledging that
statistically sound online ad effectiveness research has not been easy to
implement at reasonable cost until recently. As IAB notes, ‘Questions around recruitment, sample bias and deployment are
hampering the validity of this research and undermining the industry as a
whole.’
Just because perfect research design is
challenging to achieve doesn’t mean that advertisers should settle for studies
with debilitating flaws, leading to biased, unreliable results. In addition to
challenges inherent to good research design, most ad effectiveness research
partners have systematic biases due to the way they find respondents, which
must be accounted for in the design phase. There has been innovation in this
space within the past year using technology to reduce or eliminate systematic
bias in respondent recruitment. 
Assuming you’re able to address the systematic
bias of your research partner’s sampling, the major remaining challenge is how
you approach the control group. At Survata, we think about this as a hierarchy: 
Using a holdout group is best practice, but
implementing it requires spending some portion of your ad budget strictly on
the control group. In other words, some of your ad budget will be spent on
intentionally NOT showing people an ad. A small portion of people in the ad buy
will instead be shown public service announcements to establish the control
group. We love the purity of this approach, but we also understand the reality
of advertising budgets. We don’t view holdout as a requirement for sound online
ad effectiveness research. Smart design combined with technology can achieve
methodologically sound control groups without ‘wasting’ ad budget.
Along those lines, the Audience Segment
approach has become de facto best practice for many of our clients. Basically,
you create your control group from the same audience segment that you’re
targeting in the ad buy. This isn’t perfect, as there could be an underlying
reason that some people in the segment saw the ad but others didn’t (e.g., some
people very rarely go online, or to very few websites), but it’s still an excellent
approach. It’s the grown-up version of Demographic Matching.
Demographic Matching, in which the control
group is created by matching as many demographic variables as possible with the
exposed group (e.g., gender, age, income), is still a very common strategy.
It’s straightforward to accomplish even using old online research
methodologies. As online data has allowed us to learn far more useful
information about consumers than demographic traits, this approach is dated.
Simply sampling GenPop as a control is
undesirable. The results are much more likely to reveal the differences between
the exposed and control groups than the effectiveness of the advertising.
Questions for your research partner:
  • What are known biases among
    respondents due to recruitment strategy?
  • What is your total reach? What
    percentage of the target group is within your reach? Is it necessary to
    weight low-IR population respondents due to lack of scale?
  • What’s your approach to creating
    control groups for online ad effectiveness research?
  • For Demographic Matching, how do
    you determine which demographic characteristics are most important to
    match?
  • How do you accomplish Audience
    Segment matching?
Recruitment/ Deployment

Historically, there were four methods to recruit respondents / deploy the
survey: panels, intercepts, in-banner, or email list. To stomach these
methodologies, researchers had to ignore one of the following flaws:
non-response bias, misrepresentation, interruption of the customer experience
or email list atrophy. In our view, these methodologies are now dated since the
advent of the publisher network methodology.

The publisher network works by offering
consumers content, ad-free browsing, or other benefits (e.g. free Wi-Fi) in
exchange for taking a survey. The survey is completed as an alternative to
paying for the content or service after the consumer organically visits the
publisher. In addition to avoiding the flaws of the old methodologies, the
publisher network model provides dramatically increased accuracy, scale, and speed.
Questions for your research partner:
  • What incentives are offered in
    exchange for respondent participation?
  • What are the attitudinal,
    behavioral, and demographic differences between someone willing to be in a
    panel versus someone not interested in being in a panel?
  • What are the attitudinal,
    behavioral, and demographic differences between someone willing to take a
    site intercept survey versus someone not interested in taking a site
    intercept survey?
  • How much does non-response bias
    affect the data?
  • Are you integrated with the
    client’s DMP?
  • How long to get the survey into
    the field, and how long until completed?
  • How does the vendor ensure that
    exposure bias doesn’t occur?
  • How does the vendor account for
    straight-liners, speeders, and other typical data quality issues?
Optimization

An optimal ad effectiveness campaign returns results quickly, so that immediate
and continuous adjustments can be made to replace poorly performing creative,
targeting, and placements with higher performing ones. We call this real-time
spend allocation. It’s analogous to real-time click-through rate optimization,
as it relies on solutions to the same math problem (known as the multi-armed bandit).

By integrating with DMPs, ad effectiveness
research can be cross-tabbed against even more datasets. The results will yield
additional insights about a company’s existing customers.
Questions for your research partner:
  • Are results reported real-time?
  • How much advertising budget is
    wasted due to non-optimization?
  • How can DMP data be incorporated
    to improve ad research?
Conclusion

Flawed research methodologies can’t grow up,
they can only continue to lower prices for increasingly suspect data. For
online ad effectiveness research to grow up, new methodologies must be adopted.

To learn more about
conducting your own ad effectiveness study, visit Survata

The Ruthless Efficiency of Algorithms is Advancing Digital Frontiers

We recently caught up with Alistair Croll, Visiting
Executive at Harvard Business School as well as our Marketing Analytics &
Data Science Conference keynote speaker, to discuss the state of marketing
analytics and data science, and where it’s going in the future.
Today, Croll helps to accelerate startups, and works with
some of the world’s biggest companies on business model innovation. As an
entrepreneur, he co-founded Coradiant; the Year One Labs accelerator; and a many
other startups. Not to mention, he’s a sought-after speaker, and has launched
and chaired some of the world’s leading conferences on emerging technology,
including Startupfest, Strata, Cloud Connect, and Pandemon.io. Croll is also the
author of four books on technology and entrepreneurship, including the
best-selling Lean Analytics, which has been translated into eight languages.
What is the state of
the data science and analytics industry in 2017?

Croll: There is a realization that data itself doesn’t lead
to answers. This is really maturity: It’s asking the right question that’s
hard. Big data is replacing business intelligence, but most of it is still
being used to run reports and batch processes’rather than to find advantage or
insight.
At the same time, feeding the corpus of data into learning
algorithms holds promise. Those with the authority to do so are pointing
machine learning at their data seta to find correlations, then testing those
for causal relationships they can exploit.
What have been the
biggest changes data science and analytics since you started your career?

Croll: I’m not an analyst by trade. But the biggest change
is clear: once, we first defined the schema, then collected data. Now, we
collect the data, then define the schema.
In other words, “Collect first, ask questions
later.” This is a huge difference, but it has sort of snuck up on us. It
means we can iterate more, answering questions and adjusting our lines of
inquiry.
Have the influx of
social media and mobile made your job easier or harder?

Croll: More data sets mean more potential insights, but also
more spurious correlations. So it’s a two-edged sword.
How is data science
and analytics transforming every industry right now?

Croll: The simple, and somewhat terrifying, truth is that AI
gets unreasonably powerful, very quickly. Whether driving a car, or playing a
video game, or diagnosing a disease, or optimizing the design of an aircraft
part, algorithms are better than humans. They don’t get tired; they make fewer
mistakes; they don’t take breaks.
And what do we feed such algorithms? Data. There is no
industry that will not be changed by the ruthless efficiency of algorithms
advancing its digital frontiers.
Why is data science considered
the ‘sexiest job of the 21st century’?

Croll: Data science is the intersection of statistics,
critical thinking, and engineering. It requires a sense of narrative, and the
ability to build something. It’s that element of engineering that distinguishes
it from simple analytics, because it builds things that become products, or
processes. Rather than running a report, it improves the report’s results.
If big data is oil, data science is the refinery that makes
it usable.
What is the biggest
challenge in data science and analytics today?

Croll: We are still, sadly, trying to replace opinions with
facts. My good friend Randy Smerik argues that there’s no such thing as big
data: An airline that knows you’re running late fails to update your hotel;
false positives about in credit card management.
His point is that while we have tremendous amounts of data,
we seldom apply them to significantly improve the business or the customer
experience because doing so means making fundamental changes to the organization,
job descriptions, customer policies, and so on.
Where do you see data
science and analytics moving in the next 5 years?

Croll: Democratization, with the help of smart agents.
Pundits have been saying that for a long time, but in the last couple of years
tools like Cortana, Google Now, Siri, and Alexa’as well as various chat
interfaces like Slack, Sophos, and Skype’are going mainstream.
I also think that insurers will put significant pressure on
companies to implement better analytics and algorithms because it will be too
risky to do otherwise. If the organization can know everything about itself all
the time, it will be expected to do so. “We didn’t know this was
happening” will no longer be an excuse. And consequently, algorithms that
can parse all of that data and reduce risk will be mandatory.
Hear more from
Alistair during his keynote session, ‘Don’t’ Get Duped by Data’ at the
Marketing Analytics & Data Science Conference April 3-5, 2017 in San
Francisco, CA.

Data science and marketing analytics are transforming every
industry. There is a reason why it is being called the sexiest job of the 21st
century. Calling all professionals that want to harness analytics and data
science! Do you realize how critical you are to the future of your organization?
Learn more here: https://goo.gl/CbYosj

Use our exclusive
Blog discount code MADS17BL for $100 off the current rate. Buy your tickets
here:
https://goo.gl/CbYosj

The Media Insights & Engagement Conference 2017 Recap

By: Jim Bono, Vice President, Research, Crown Media Family Networks 
Nearly 300
research and insights executives from over 140 different organizations in the
media industry gathered in Fort Lauderdale seeking to overcome measurement
challenges, uncover the next generation of research methodologies, and create
new engagement strategies.
Day 1 recap
MI&E
Conference Coordinator, Rachel McDonald, started off the day welcoming this
year’s attendees and introducing this year’s co-chairs: Janet Gallent
(NBCUniversal), Rob McLoughlin (POPSUGAR) and Bruce Friend
(Maru/Matchbox).
OPENING KEYNOTE
INTERVIEW – RE-IMAGINING THE FUTURE OF TELEVISION
Bruce sat with
Turner’s Howard Shimmel for a one-on-one discussion about the future of the
industry.  Recently, at a Cynopsis
conference, Shimmel said “we’re at a measurement crisis.”  Elaborating on that comment, he explained how
it’s 2017 and we still do not have a robust cross-platform solution for our
industry. Advertisers want an infrastructure that allows more exposure than
just reach and frequency.  With Total
Audience, we still don’t know what to do with it.
They also
discussed the Turner Ad Lab, and how people go to Netflix, Hulu, etc., to watch
content without ads. What can we do to make the advertising experience better
for the consumer?
Howard believes
that the industry should have a published document that mandates what currency
data research vendors should provide for the content providers. As new
platforms are emerging, we need to better understand where those consumers are
going to find content.
Bruce asked
about big data and how it’s all the rage. As an industry where do we go from
here?  Howard explained how there is an
abundance of research tools out there. 
We just haven’t done a good enough job telling our clients that we have
all these tools.  Big data is a component
to an overall data framework. We need to know when to use it and not to use it.
Sometimes Big Data can be wrong data.
Bruce also
questioned how new companies are great with tech but don’t understand the data
they deliver. However, other great long-time research companies are very good
at analyzing data but don’t have the tech. 
Howard feels that there’s nothing wrong with using a combination of data
sets like Nielsen, MRI, and panel data to come up with the best solution.
Unfortunately, there are too many companies that reach out and don’t really
understand our businesses.
He still
believes that survey research is important to our industry as data tells what,
but not why.
KEYNOTE 1 – THE
IMPORTANCE OF RACE AND ETHNICITY IN REACHING MILLENNIALS
Cathy Cohen,
Professor at University of Chicago, gave us a very entertaining look at
millennials and the importance of race and ethnicity among this group,
especially regarding this year’s election. The majority of Millennials in the
US are Hispanic and African-American, and by 2060 White will be a minority.
In this past
year’s election, more African-American and Latino Millennials voted for
Democrats, while there were more white Millennials voting Republican. However,
in the 2016 primary vote the choice among all Millennials (regardless of
ethnicity) was Bernie Sanders.
Cohen’s
presentation covered
??        
The complexity of Millennials through a racial framework
??        
Researching race and Millennials
??        
Rise of Millennials in the workforce
??        
Importance of Millennials in the Political force
Millennials are
becoming an increasingly important electoral demographic.  The share of eligible voters that are
Millennials has grown during last 3 elections:
??        
2008 – 23%
??        
2012 – 29%
??        
2016 – 36%
Cohen also
addressed the six key problems with studying Millennials:
1.      
 Generational frames /
over-representation of white Millennials
2.      
 Under investigation of
white Millennials
3.      
 Homogenous communities of
color missing Millennials
4.      
 Segmentation of Millennials
of color – pick one!
5.      
 Millennials as experts of
Millennials – homophily
6.      
 One-offs or waves – assumes
stability in taste, preferences and decisions
KEYNOTE PANEL -
HOW CONSUMERS ENGAGE WITH PROGRAMMING ACROSS SOCIAL PLATFORMS
‘ moderated by Sean Casey, Nielsen Social Guide
o  
Brian Robinson (Facebook)
o  
Tom Ciszik (Twitter)
o  
Guy Ram (NBC)
o  
Leslie Koch (HBO)
Insights from
this panel discussion focused on the evolution of social media and how quickly
it’s grown.
Consumers spend
5.5 hours per week using Social Media on their smartphone.
64% of
consumers use smartphone while watching TV. 
1.2 billion
interact on Social referring to TV.
After breaking
for lunch hour afternoon consisted of Concurrent
Tracks
.  These case studies were
broken into three groups:
??        
Track 1 -
Targeting Viewers
??        
Track 2 – Audience
Insights
??        
Track 3 – Innovation
in Media
The Audience
Insights
breakouts were:
?? 
REVOLUTIONIZING
HOW THE WORLD SEES MILLENNIALS AND GEN Z
‘ Rich Cornish and Tasja Kirkwood, Viacom
?? 
HOW STARZ
STRECHES RESEARCH FURTHER
‘ Kendra Sindleman, Starz Entertainment
?? 
PUT A SEXY SPIN
ON YOUR SALES STORY
‘ Karen Ramspacher, David Tice and Jola Burnett, GfK MRI
?? 
LEVERAGING FAN
PASSION IN COLLEGE SPORTS
‘ Keith Friedenberg, WME/IMG
?? 
EMOTIONAL
CONNECTION: A MEASURE BEYOND RATINGS FOR TELEVISION
‘ Lauren
Zweifler, NBCU
The Innovations
in Media
breakouts were:
?? 
MAXIMIZING AD
ENGAGEMENT IN TOTDAY’S CROSS-PLATFORM WORLD
‘ Jon
Giegengack and Peter Fondulas, Hub Entertainment Research, and Richard Zackon,
CRE
?? 
EXPLORING THE FUTURES OF STORYTELLING AND ENGAGEMENT THROUGH SLOW
INNOVATION
- Sam Ford, MIT Comparative Media Studies
?? 
VOICES OF MADTECH: HOW MARKETERS & AGENCIES SEE THE MADTECH WORLD ‘ Sherrill Mane, Ipsos
Connect
?? 
LEVERAGING AUDIENCE
VIEWERSHIP & BEAVIORAL INSIGHTS FOR LINEAR MONETIZATION
‘ Shiv Sehgal,
RSG Media
Below are the Track 1 – Targeting Viewers case
studies:
FROM ORDINARY
TARGET TO PERSUADABLE TARGET
David Kaplan
from Bravo, along with Zach Schessel from NBCU and Peter Bouchard from Civis
Analytics, discussing how to hit the right target audience and
“swing” viewers. The presentation also looked at how to attract
casual viewers without alienating the core viewers.
Key takeaways
were:
??        
The different creative approach is often required for on-air vs.
off-channel to drive maximum impact with loyal and casual viewers
??        
Casual Bravo viewers may all have some affinity for the network
but only the “swing viewers” in this group can be readily persuaded
to deepen their commitment and watch more
??        
 An ad’s positive persuadability
should be balanced with any potential backlash effects to ensure a net positive
effect
??        
 Not all swing viewers are
created equal, e.g. consumers in different DMAs can have a varied response to
creative hooks
VIEWING
PREDICTIONS & INVENTORY OPTIMIZATION: THE SECRETS TO SUCCESS IN AUDIENCE
TARGETING
Steve Schmitt
of TiVo showed us how TiVo is helping clients get from traditional linear to
non-linear content, and how they improved campaign performance using optimizers
and brand targeting. His presentation focused on how:
??        
 TV consumption has
undergone profound changes, especially Millennials age 18-34
??        
 Total video consumption
continues to expand with DVR, VOD, SVOD and online/mobile viewing extending the
power of linear TV
??        
 Linear TV has majority share,
but it is declining as on-demand options expand
Concepts on the
rise are binge viewing, on-demand, cord-cutting and cord-shaving, while things
like appointment viewing and one-size-fits-all on decline.
ONLINE VIDEO IN
THE TOOLBOX: A MUST HAVE
Darlene
LaChapelle and Maya Abinakad from AOL talked about the top drivers for video
growth, with “social media video offerings” and “better quality
creative” leading the way, and how online video growth is driven by mobile
devices.
??        
Online video viewing on a smartphone is on par with that of a
computer
??        
 Consumers indicate they
have few technical barriers watching online video on their smartphones, but get
the convenience of watching anywhere, anytime
??        
 62% said I watch more
online video today than one year ago
??        
 62% said in the next 6 months
I expect to watch more online video
Laptop/desktop
(70%) is still the leading device on which online video is watch daily, just
edging smartphone (67%)
HOW TO ENGAGE
MULTICULTURAL MILLENNIAL INFLUENCERS IN 2017 AND BEYOND
Our afternoon
continued with our only Track 1 panel. 
The panel was moderated by Horowitz’s Adriana Waterson, and we heard
from Michele Meyer (Univision), Tom Kralik (Revolt) and Lia Silkworth
(Telemundo) as they discussed their key takeaways about multicultural
millennials and the importance of this audience in our business today, as
leading consumers of cross-platform media.
??        
 Hispanics are leading the
charge in cross-platform media consumption
??        
 Millennial and Gen Z trends
ARE multicultural trends
??        
Gen Z is more diverse and multicultural and are digital natives
??        
 If you join a multicultural
network, your general market skills may not “translate”
THE NEXT
GENERATION OF AD EFFECTIVENESS
Our first day
concluded with this presentation from Chris Kelly at Survata.
Day
2 recap
Co-chair Rob
McLoughlin opened the morning with a recap for Day 1, and a look at what to
expect for Day 2.
KEYNOTE 1: MULTIDIMENSIONAL MEDIA & THE FUTURE OF
ENGAGEMENT
Amber Case,
author of Design for the Next Generation of Devices, gave us a comical look at
connected devices and how the average consumer has become dependent on them.  She showed us products like PetNet, and how
the Web and technology play a major role in self-development.
In this world
of ever changing technology, we need to make sure that ‘machines shouldn’t act
like humans, and humans shouldn’t act like machines.’
KEYNOTE 2 – DIGITAL HUMANISM: THE COMING AGE OF CONTENT
Edwin Wong of
Buzzfeed gave us his insights on Recoding Culture.  We got a look at Millennials and how culture
is being reshaped and where it’s headed.
76% of Gen Y
say “it’s the norm to be radical” (as opposed to 60% of Gen X).
Buzzfeed conducted
a study breaking millennials into 4 groups:
o  
Omegas
o  
Sigma’s
o  
Cult Kids
o  
Nichesters
And we found
that there are strong overlaps between these groups.
Wong stressed
how we’re moving towards the end of demographics, evolution of psychographics
and the rise of the individual.
He ended his
keynote with a very touching video about Asians and their stories about the sacrifices
their parents made for them.
KEYNOTE 3 – BEYOND
THE STORY: WHY YOU NEED A NARRATIVE
Tobin
Trevarthen of 21st Century Narrative and author of Narrative Generation was our
next keynote speaker and covered:
??        
what is a narrative
??        
why you need a narrative
??        
story vs. Narrative
??        
building a narrative
A narrative
differs from a story.  More directly, a
narrative is a mosaic of related, contextual stories that inform and define
one’s perspective.
A story has a
beginning, a middle and an end.  A story
has a plot, and acts as a one-way monologue.
A narrative is
endless, and has a more interactive dialogue.
Tobin showed
how Tesla automotive expanded the brand narrative to reach consumers.
KEYNOTE 4 – ADDRESSING
TRUST AND TRANSPARENCY WITH BIG DATA IN TV MEASUREMENT
Mainak
Mazumdar, CRO of Nielsen, was our last keynote speaker of the morning.  Mazumdar explained how recently data sets had
errors and inaccuracies in station crediting, time shifted content and missing
live viewing.  He addressed 2 key
questions:
??        
what is our “ground truth?
??        
how do we understand and correct for biases?
Nielsen used
RPD data along with 200,000+ high quality person’s panel to address methodology
challenges.
His RPD data
and panel findings showed that:
??        
20% of live RPD minutes were credited to the wrong station
??        
25% of live viewing in the RPD was missing
??        
40% of time shifted viewing was credited to the wrong content
Nielsen is
working hard to understand and correct these inaccuracies.
The Day 2
afternoon Audience Insights breakouts were:
?? 
comScore SHARES
THE KEY TO UNLOCKING AUDIENCE INSIGHTS
‘ Carol Hinnant, comScore
?? 
WHY CO-VIEWING
MATTERS

Marc Normand, Disney-Freeform and Brian West, Disney ABC
?? 
AUDIENCE
INSIGHTS FOR 2017 AND BEYOND
‘ Rick Kelly, FUEL CYCLE
?? 
ADVANCE YOUR
INSIGHTS BY REBUILDING YOUR COMSUMER COMMUNITY
‘ Jim Powel,
Comcast
The Innovations
in Media
breakouts were:
?? 
INSIGHTS OR
INSANITY IN THE AGE OF COMPLEXITY
‘ James Petretti, Sony Pictures Television
?? 
HOW BBC AMERICA BROUGHT THEIR AUDIENCE TO LIFE THROUGH ETHNO-SEGMENTATION ‘ Courtney
Thomasma, BBC America and Robert Miner, Miner & Co.
?? 
MARKETING TV NEWS RELEVANT TO NEW GENERATIONS ‘ Kimberly
Maxwell, NBC News, Sam Ford, MIT Comparative and Peggy Einnehmer, LRW
?? 
FUTURE OF
ONLINE VIDEO
‘ David Dowd, Tubular Labs
Below are the Track 1 – Targeting Viewers case
studies:
CHANNEL ME
Jason
Shalaveyus from Starcom and Nicole Tramontano from Turner showed us how agencies
and media companies need to understand how consumer video ad experiences keep
pace with content experiences. 
Despite the
industry pendulum swing away from engaged reach towards efficiency and
programmatic buying in recent years, Starcom and Turner set out to determine:
??        
Relative importance of contextual factors that influence ad
receptivity
??        
Range of impact for individual factors
??        
Net effect of multiple factors
??        
Prevalence of optimal contexts among segments
??        
Whether contextual relevance can improve upon category relevance
??        
If ceding even more control to the viewer improved the overall
viewing experience
Top findings:
??        
Easy wins where you have high control over highly influential
factors are hard to come by
??        
Life environments affect receptivity more than ad environments
??        
Content has a stable shelf life, but ads spoil quickly
??        
Relevance is important both in the market and in the moment
??        
The cat is out of the bag as far as control, but leashes can work
In summary:
A rising tide
lifts all boats.
Don’t neglect
the impact of context.
Be selective.
Be Flexible.
GEN Z: DIVING
INTO THE YOUTH GENERATION
Armida Ascano
and Gil Haddi from Trend Hunter are helping clients find the stories that
connect them to Gen Z (infants to 17) – what defines them and what they mean to
Media.  They are not as big as
Millennials, but they are just as important. 
By 2020, Gen Z will be 40% of the consumer base.
They explained
the overall differences between to two age group.
Online
Presence:
??        
Gen Y ‘ Facebook (overshare)
??        
Gen Z ‘ Snapchat (private)
Media
Consumption:
??        
Gen Y ‘ Love content
??        
Gen Z ‘ Really, really love content
Outlook on
Life:
??        
Gen Y ‘ Laissez faire
??        
Gen Z ‘ Cautiously planning
Gen Z is the
most diverse generation, and they are underrepresented in the mainstream media.
As a result, they turn to influencers who look and speak like them.
They already
have the tools, creativity and desire to create, but do not enjoy passive media
consumption.
This generation
is swapping in aspiration for realism.  As
content providers, we need to choose influencers and messaging with this in
mind.
VIEWER CHOICE: PRIMETIME
ALL OF THE TIME
A nearly packed
room showed up to see Melanie Schneider (AMC) and Stephanie Yates (WE) present
their case study.
‘TV is Dead! Run for the Hills!’ ‘Cord-cutting Means the End of Linear!’
‘Cable TV as We Know it is Dying!’
These are the comments we hear in the press everyday about our
industry.  And it’s true that TV viewership
has shown downward declines over the past 5 years.  However, content is up more than ever.  How are we able to watch all this content?  Technology has propelled viewer choice.
AMC Networks
did a study focusing on content, taking a deeper dive into Nielsen respondent
level data exploring viewers, their habits, and how they watch content.
THE OTT
CONUNDRUM: USING PSYCHOGRAPHICS TO UNDERSTAND CROSS-PLATFORM VIDEO CONSUMPTION
Tamara Barber
from Simmons Research gave us a presentation explaining that video consumption
is not just linear and live anymore. 
The majority of
the share of Broadcast viewing still comes from Live (35%) and DVR playback up
to 7 days (34%).  The same holds true for
Cable, with 43% viewing done Live and 26% coming from DVR playback in the first
7 days.  However, there is still a large
market opportunity for DVR after 7 days, VOD after 3 days, and OTT.
Simmons looked
at comprehensive video measurement across linear, SVOD, OTT and other connected
devices.
OTT users are
psychographically different. The Top 10 OTT user attributes included:
??        
more digital
??        
more social media
While the Top
10 attributes for non-OTT users included:
??        
use cell phone for calling only
??        
read newspaper daily 
Simmons is
hoping to use psychographics to optimize Media planning and buying.
Day
3 recap
Day 3 started with co-chair Bruce Friend recapping Day 2,
then introducing today’s first keynote speaker.
KEYNOTE 1 – MONEYBALL:
THE ART OF WINNING AN UNFAIR GAME

Paul Depodesta, CSO of Cleveland Browns,
engaged the audience with an overview that there’s a certain way that things
work.  Whether baseball, black jack, or
other situations in life, there’s always that ‘rule of thumb’ that we are
taught to follow.  However, sometimes the
‘rule’ doesn’t always work.  It’s all
about the process. Paul described a process/outcome quad:
??        
Good process/ Good outcome =
success
??        
Good process/ Bad outcome
= just unlucky
??        
Bad process/
Good outcome = get lucky once, but then rely on that luck to be successful
again
??        
Bad process/
Bad outcome = recipe for failure 

So, how do you
win with a lack of resources? 
Putting together a championship team is like cooking a
gourmet meal – you need the right ingredients. 
We’re always asking the naive questions- why is the market
down, why is this player struggling? We need a reason, but there not always is
a reason, so we try to explain by creating our own cause and relationships.
As with The
Oakland A’s in Moneyball, sometimes we need to throw out the old metrics, that
‘rule of thumb’ and start new.  Key
takeaways he learned from testing these new metrics were:         
??        
Find skillful
affordable talent to replace high priced starts
??        
Statistics can
be misleading
He drew
comparisons of scouting baseball players to testing programs.  Emotions drive our decisions, and we tend to
look for data to support and confirm these decisions, while dismissing any data
that contradicts what we believe.

Paul left us
with these 3 points: 
??        
become aware
of biases
??        
become
relentless in asking the naive question
??        
in the game of
uncertainty, how can we beat the house? Learn by previous failures to better
hit success.
KEYNOTE 2 – INSIGHTS
FROM THE 2016 ELECTION

The late morning keynote was actually broken
into 3 parts.  Robin Garfield of CNN
spoke first, and then we heard Dr. John Lapinski from NBC News, followed by a
Q&A with our 2 speakers.

Millennials told us they wanted a candidate who has a plan
to:
?? 
Create good paying jobs
?? 
Make healthcare more affordable
?? 
Do something about the soaring
costs of higher education and student debt
Millennials also told us they didn’t want a candidate who:
?? 
Represents ‘more of the same’
They were looking for a transformational candidate – someone
who will ‘change the government’, and that they were ‘done with the Clintons
and Bushes.’
Most Millennials liked Bernie Sanders, and both
Trump and Clinton were viewed negatively.

Not only was 2016 the most watched year on record in cable
news (with over 3 million total P2+ aggregate audience), but more people came
out to vote in 2016 than ever before.
??        
2000 ‘ 105.4
million total turnout (54.2% of eligible population that voted)
??        
2004 ‘ 122.3
million (60.1%)
??        
2008 ‘ 131.3
million (61.6%)
??        
2012 ‘ 129,1
million (58.6%)
??        
2016 ‘ 136.6
million (59.0%)
We were show examples of ‘what-if’ scenarios, that
demonstrated how close the election really was.
While Clinton’s popular vote lead was just shy of 3 million
(65.8 million for Clinton compared to 63.0 million for Trump), the red/blue map
showed that the majority of Clinton’s popular vote came from New York and
California.  And the 2016 Electoral
College hinged on a handful of states, with Trump taking Florida and the Rust
Belt states (Iowa, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin).
KEYNOTE PANEL
- CROSS PLATFORM MEASUREMENT AND THE FUTURE OF MEDIA
Jane Clark, from the Coalition for Innovative Media
Measurement, moderated this panel which included:
Jed Meyer (Univision), Jonathan Steuer (Omnicom),
Carol Hinnant (comScore), Steven Schmitt
(TiVo) and Kelly Abcarian (Nielsen).
The panel gave us a perspective of the industry from the
network, agency, and measurement side.  They
addressed the integrity of data and optimizing tools for better plans.  They talked about how there’s a constant
struggle trying to bring all measurement across all platforms together.
Kelly stressed how measurement needs to be a team sport.  Media companies are more and more starting to
own their own data, and that changes the dynamic of the industry.
There is a call from the network and agency side for duration
weighted viewable impressions across all platforms, and the measurement
companies just aren’t there yet.  The
question remains ‘ how do we get there?
The Day 3
afternoon Audience Insights breakouts were:
?? 
MULTICULTURAL
TV AUDIENCES ON TWITTER
‘ Meghann Elrhoul, Twitter
?? 
FULL SPECTRUM:
ILLUMINATING THE CONTENT PREFERENCES OF MULTICULTURAL AUDIENCE
‘ Thomas
Grayman, SpikeTV
The Innovations
in Media
breakouts were:
?? 
USING TRENDING
DATA TO UNCOVER THE WHITE SPACE
‘ Rob McLoughlin, POPSUGAR
Below are the Track 1 – Targeting Viewers case
studies:
QUANTIFYING
CROSS-PLATFORM ADVERTISING IMPACT IN LATIN AMERICA

ESPN’s David Hobbie gave us insight to David’s study focused on an advertising
campaign during this past year’s Olympics in Rio, and the impact and brand lift
experienced on ESPN Latin America.
THE STORY OF
KIDS MEDIA
The last case study track of the conference had Theresa
Pepe of Viacom give us an in depth look at kids’ data and… The
Story of Me.
We learned about kids under 11 and how they are the most
diverse kids ever. They make up 15.4% of the US population, and are extremely
persuasive. 
Theresa showed us a breakdown of these kids
focusing on:
??        
My beginning
??        
My world
??        
My family
??        
Myself
??        
My friends
??        
My tech
??        
My dreams
??        
Me in a nutshell. 

Since they were born these kids experienced: 
- The
first Black president 
- Terrorism
- Marriage equality 
- Great recession 
- YouTubers 
- On demand 
- Social Media 
- Device overload 
- Gender neutrality 

Their role models are their families’ and some
celebrities.  While 78% of girls look up
to mom, on 58% of boys look up to dad. 
26% said the look up to a grandparent, while the rest of their role
models included YouTube/Vine stars (19%), teacher (18%), brother (17%), sister
(15%), aunt/uncle/cousin (13%), actor/actress (10%), athlete (10%).
And they are busy!  6.2
hours of the day they are in school, while the rest of their day entails
sleeping (8.7 hours), eating/traveling (1.7 hours), organized sports/activities
(.9 hours), doing homework (.8 hours), and 6.4 hours going towards leisure (26%
of their day.)
In their free time, they watch TV (48%), play with toys
(43%), play video games (33%), and play outside (18%).
CONFERENCE
WRAP-UP

The Conference concluded with a wrap-up with the year’s
co-chairs and the advisory panel giving their feedback of the sessions,
discussing plans for next year’s conference, and taking questions from the
audience.