#MediaInsights Day 3 Recap

Day 3 started with co-chair Bruce Friend recapping Day 2,
then introducing today’s first keynote speaker.
KEYNOTE 1 – MONEYBALL:
THE ART OF WINNING AN UNFAIR GAME

Paul Depodesta, CSO of Cleveland Browns,
engaged the audience with an overview that there’s a certain way that things
work.  Whether baseball, black jack, or
other situations in life, there’s always that ‘rule of thumb’ that we are
taught to follow.  However, sometimes the
‘rule’ doesn’t always work.  It’s all
about the process. Paul described a process/outcome quad:

??        
Good process/ Good outcome =
success
??        
Good process/ Bad outcome
= just unlucky
??        
Bad process/
Good outcome = get lucky once, but then rely on that luck to be successful
again
??        
Bad process/
Bad outcome = recipe for failure 

So, how do you
win with a lack of resources? 

Putting together a championship team is like cooking a
gourmet meal – you need the right ingredients. We’re always asking the naive questions- why is the market
down, why is this player struggling? We need a reason, but there not always is
a reason, so we try to explain by creating our own cause and relationships.
As with The
Oakland A’s in Moneyball, sometimes we need to throw out the old metrics, that
‘rule of thumb’ and start new.  Key
takeaways he learned from testing these new metrics were:         
??        
Find skillful
affordable talent to replace high priced starts
??        
Statistics can
be misleading
He drew
comparisons of scouting baseball players to testing programs.  Emotions drive our decisions, and we tend to
look for data to support and confirm these decisions, while dismissing any data
that contradicts what we believe.

Paul left us
with these 3 points: 
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become aware
of biases
??        
become
relentless in asking the naive question
??        
in the game of
uncertainty, how can we beat the house? Learn by previous failures to better
hit success.
KEYNOTE 2 – INSIGHTS
FROM THE 2016 ELECTION

The late morning keynote was actually broken
into 3 parts.  Robin Garfield of CNN
spoke first, and then we heard Dr. John Lapinski from NBC News, followed by a
Q&A with our 2 speakers.

Millennials told us they wanted a candidate who has a plan
to:
?? 
Create good paying jobs
?? 
Make healthcare more affordable

Millennials also told us they didn’t want a candidate who:
?? 
Represents ‘more of the same’
They were looking for a transformational candidate – someone
who will ‘change the government’, and that they were ‘done with the Clintons
and Bushes.’
Most Millennials liked Bernie Sanders, and both
Trump and Clinton were viewed negatively.

Not only was 2016 the most watched year on record in cable
news (with over 3 million total P2+ aggregate audience), but more people came
out to vote in 2016 than ever before.
??        
2000 ‘ 105.4
million total turnout (54.2% of eligible population that voted)
??        
2004 ‘ 122.3 million
(60.1%)
??        
2008 ‘ 131.3
million (61.6%)
??        
2012 ‘ 129,1
million (58.6%)
??        
2016 ‘ 136.6
million (59.0%)
We were show examples of ‘what-if’ scenarios, that
demonstrated how close the election really was.
While Clinton’s popular vote lead was just shy of 3 million
(65.8 million for Clinton compared to 63.0 million for Trump), the red/blue map
showed that the majority of Clinton’s popular vote came from New York and
California.  And the 2016 Electoral
College hinged on a handful of states, with Trump taking Florida and the Rust
Belt states (Iowa, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin).

KEYNOTE PANEL – CROSS PLATFORM MEASUREMENT AND THE FUTURE
OF MEDIA
                 
Jane Clark, from the Coalition for Innovative Media
Measurement, moderated this panel which included:
Jed Meyer (Univision), Jonathan Steuer (Omnicom),
Carol Hinnant (comScore), Steven Schmitt
(TiVo) and Kelly Abcarian (Nielsen).
The panel gave us a perspective of the industry from the
network, agency, and measurement side.  They
addressed the integrity of data and optimizing tools for better plans.  They talked about how there’s a constant
struggle trying to bring all measurement across all platforms together.
Kelly stressed how measurement needs to be a team sport.  Media companies are more and more starting to
own their own data, and that changes the dynamic of the industry.
There is a call from the network and agency side for duration
weighted viewable impressions across all platforms, and the measurement
companies just aren’t there yet.  The
question remains ‘ how do we get there?
The Day 3
afternoon Audience Insights breakouts were:
?? 
MULTICULTURAL
TV AUDIENCES ON TWITTER
‘ Meghann Elrhoul, Twitter
?? 
FULL SPECTRUM:
ILLUMINATING THE CONTENT PREFERENCES OF MULTICULTURAL AUDIENCE
‘ Thomas
Grayman, SpikeTV
The Innovations
in Media
breakouts were:
?? 
USING TRENDING
DATA TO UNCOVER THE WHITE SPACE
‘ Rob McLoughlin, POPSUGAR
Below are the Track 1 – Targeting Viewers case
studies:
QUANTIFYING
CROSS-PLATFORM ADVERTISING IMPACT IN LATIN AMERICA

ESPN’s David Hobbie gave us insight to David’s study focused on an advertising
campaign during this past year’s Olympics in Rio, and the impact and brand lift
experienced on ESPN Latin America.
THE STORY OF
KIDS MEDIA
The last case study track of the conference had Theresa
Pepe of Viacom give us an in depth look at kids’ data and… The
Story of Me.
We learned about kids under 11 and how they are the most
diverse kids ever. They make up 15.4% of the US population, and are extremely
persuasive. 
Theresa showed us a breakdown of these kids
focusing on:
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My beginning
??        
My world
??        
My family
??        
Myself
??        
My friends
??        
My tech
??        
My dreams
??        
Me in a nutshell. 

Since they were born these kids experienced: 
- The
first Black president 
- Terrorism
- Marriage equality 
- Great recession 
- YouTubers 
- On demand 
- Social Media 
- Device overload 
- Gender neutrality 

Their role models are their families’ and some
celebrities.  While 78% of girls look up
to mom, on 58% of boys look up to dad. 
26% said the look up to a grandparent, while the rest of their role
models included YouTube/Vine stars (19%), teacher (18%), brother (17%), sister
(15%), aunt/uncle/cousin (13%), actor/actress (10%), athlete (10%).
And they are busy!  6.2
hours of the day they are in school, while the rest of their day entails
sleeping (8.7 hours), eating/traveling (1.7 hours), organized sports/activities
(.9 hours), doing homework (.8 hours), and 6.4 hours going towards leisure (26%
of their day.)
In their free time, they watch TV (48%), play with toys
(43%), play video games (33%), and play outside (18%).
CONFERENCE
WRAP-UP

The Conference concluded with a wrap-up with the year’s
co-chairs and the advisory panel giving their feedback of the sessions,
discussing plans for next year’s conference, and taking questions from the
audience.