Call for Submissions Now Open: The Media Insights & Engagement Case Study Competition

The Media Insights & Engagement Conference announces a call for submissions for the Case Study Competition.

At the first annual Case Study Competition & Awards, three jury selected finalists will present innovative, results-driven methodologies and applications from field-tested research. Based on a combination of jury and audience votes, the winning case study will be announced before the end of the conference. The Case Study Competition is open to all marketing insights, intelligence and research analysts, managers, directors, vice presidents, suppliers and consultants.

The deadline for submissions is Friday, December 5, 2014. For complete information, including submission details, judging criteria and entry form, please click here: http://bit.ly/1pY6yKj

We encourage you to pass this announcement to any individuals or groups who you feel would be potential candidates for this competition.

To learn more about The Media Insights & Engagement Conference, visit our website: http://bit.ly/1zJ8bVC

Best regards,

The Media Insights & Engagement Conference Team

@-MediaFusion
#MediaInsights15
Digitalimpactblog.iirusa.com

Desktop to Wrist Watch Surveys: The Future of Market Research

When was the last time you recall sitting at your computer with leisure time to Web search as you please? Between commuting, longer days at work, squeezing in that workout, and finally eating, it is becoming very uncommon for one to find time to sit down at a computer and search the Internet. Minimal leisure Internet time therefore makes reaching potential online survey panelists even more tough to reach.
How is this impacting the data collected from online market research? For traditional online surveys, it seems it is becoming harder and harder to reach preferred data numbers let alone certain target groups. Where does this lead us to and how can we overcome this obstacle?
The most obvious and trending answer brings us to mobile. Allowing users to take abbreviated, reformatted surveys via mobile device is one way to increase sample size and reach what was traditionally called the ‘general population.’ Making the survey-taking experience simplified, convenient, and ready for today’s constant on-the-go consumers will drastically change the current problem of unreachable respondents. In addition to reaching more consumers, mobile has numerous advantages over traditional desktop online surveys. Take, for instance, geolocation capabilities which allow for tailoring of surveys according to the respondent’s location. Or in-store research, allowing customers to actually be in store making tradeoffs and purchases to evaluate choices in the environment we try to replicate online. Qualitative research can be enhanced with mobile devices, allowing respondents to video their shopping experience and take images.
Similarly, smart eyewear has recently come into play within the market research realm. Allowing for even more consumer behavior analysis, this technology will play a large roll in qualitative research in the years to come. Voice capabilities, eye-tracking, geolocation, you name it- these weapons of market research will change the industry!
Both of these alternatives have been discovered and are currently being explored for use. What options could 2015 bring? I believe the visual options have advanced far enough and we now must turn to understanding consumer behavior from a psychological standpoint. How can we measure what consumers really are thinking and understand this down to a neurological level. How does this then interplay with rational vs. emotional decision making models and how can we use this to influence consumers? Will the next generation eyewear include on the fly brain scans? Will the smart watch measure circulating neurotransmitters and predict choice behavior?
Changing times come with changing measures. To remain relevant we must approach this development with open arms and continue to keep looking forward!
Janel Parker, Market Research Consultant at SKIM, an international consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in Marketing and Psychology from Cornell University. Her previous experience at a social media agency combined with her knowledge from SKIM provide for a unique understanding of the relationships between social media and marketing. She can be reached at j.parker@skimgroup.com.

Call for Submissions Now Open: The Media Insights & Engagement Case Study Competition

The Media Insights & Engagement Conference announces a
call for submissions for the Case Study
Competition
.

At the first annual Case Study Competition
& Awards
, three jury selected finalists will present innovative,
results-driven methodologies and applications from field-tested research. Based
on a combination of jury and audience votes, the winning case study will be
announced before the end of the conference. The Case Study Competition is open
to all marketing insights, intelligence and research analysts, managers,
directors, vice presidents, suppliers and consultants. 


The deadline for submissions is Friday,
November 28, 2014
. For complete information, including submission details,
judging criteria and entry form, please click here: http://bit.ly/1pY6yKj

We encourage you to pass this announcement to any individuals or groups who you
feel would be potential candidates for this competition.

To learn more about The Media Insights & Engagement
Conference, visit our website: http://bit.ly/1zJ8bVC

Best regards,
 The Media Insights & Engagement Conference Team

@-MediaFusion
#MediaInsights15

Digitalimpactblog.iirusa.com

Can You Think Like Google and Amazon?

What would Google or Amazon do if they purchased your company?  What would happen if they entered your industry?

We are proud to Introduce DISRUPT, a unique one day strategy accelerator,  taking place on December 3rd, 2014 in Chicago, at the offices of Leo Burnett.

DISRUPT brings together executives across disciplines to uncover the major forces impacting the B2C world. Our intelligence lead Dr. Hitendra Patel in combination with our expert industry facilitators will help you create a future action plan to adapt to industry disruptors, and ensuring your business remains relevant, by rethinking your current business model and unveiling areas for growth. 

Visit the website for more information: http://bit.ly/1pUkAMU
This Strategy Accelerator will help you:
  • Learn how to apply powerful techniques of disruption to help your business stay at the leading edge
  • Uncover how these strategies work and, more importantly, what tactics you need to employ to achieve strategic disruption
  • Leave with an action plan tailored to your business that will help you lead your company through creative disruption into competitive advantage.

View the full agenda here: http://bit.ly/1pUkAMU
Meet your Intelligence Lead:

Dr. Hitendra Patel
Managing Director, IXL Center
Chairman of the Innovation and Growth Program, Hult International Business School

Dr. Patel has helped over 50 global companies and their executive teams build innovation capabilities and get innovation results. He has helped drive innovation transformation initiatives at companies like Johnson Controls, Hewlett Packard, LG, Alibaba.com, CEMEX, Cadbury, Verizon, and P&G. He understands how to make innovation real from the top-down and bottom-up in complex and large organizations. Read his full bio here: http://bit.ly/1oQ2vEU

Join us as we prepare you for the future of your business.

Cheers,

The DISRUPT Team

#DisruptThinking

Buzz from The Market Research Event 2014: #TMRE14

We had a great event last in Boca Raton as the best and brightest in Market Research joined together to tackle the changes and disruption in the industry at TMRE: The Market Research Event. By late Wednesday afternoon 400+ people had tweeted 3,000+ times using the hashtag #TMRE14 & which resulted in a  reach of 789,000 impressions for the TMRE event. On average, we were getting between 50-70 posts/hr, and in addition, our audience generated 470 photos, 14 videos, and 30 blog posts. It was an amazing and we are truly honored to have shared another amazing event with all of you.

Here is a list of what attendees have shared in the past week or so:

Archives:
seen.co/event/tmre-2014
eventifier.com/event/tmre14
tagboard.com/TMRE14

Recaps & News:

4 Main Takeaways From The Market Research Event via CMO

TMRE 2014: Day 1 Recap, Day 2 via Sentient Decision Science
Keen Strategy on TMRE Takeaways
And if you’re feeling a bit blue because it’s over, here’s a bit of fun to give you a quick lift until next time.
Market Research Love Song by Jibunu:
Storytelling at it’s best:
Flashmob anyone, Oye Como Va:

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 
Valerie RussoFormerly a senior copy editor at Thomson Reuters, a research editor at AOL,  and a senior web publicist at Hachette Book GroupValerie M. Russo is editor at large of The Front End of Innovation BlogThe Market Research Event BlogThe World Future Trends Tumblr, the Digital Impact Blog, and also blogs at Literanista.net. She is the innovation lead and senior social media strategist for the Marketing and Business Strategy Division of the Institute for International Research, an Informa LLC., and her poetry was published in Regrets Only on sale at the MOMA Gift Shop. Her background is in Anthropology and English Literature. You can reach her at vrusso@iirusa.com or @Literanista.

Desktop to Wrist Watch Surveys: The Future of Market Research

When was the last time you recall sitting at your computer
with leisure time to web search as you please? Between commuting, longer days
at work, squeezing in that workout, and finally eating. It is becoming very
uncommon for one to find time to sit down at a computer and search the
internet. Minimal leisure Internet time therefore makes reaching potential
online survey panelists even more tough to reach.
How is this impacting the data collected from online market
research? For traditional online surveys, it seems it is becoming harder and
harder to reach preferred data numbers let alone certain target groups. Where
does this lead us to and how can we overcome this obstacle?
The most obvious and trending answer brings us to mobile.
Allowing users to take abbreviated, reformatted surveys via mobile device is
one way to increase sample size and reach what was traditionally called the
‘general population.’ Making the survey-taking experience simplified,
convenient, and ready for today’s constant on-the-go consumers will drastically
change
the current problem of unreachable respondents. In addition to
reaching more consumers, mobile has numerous advantages over traditional
desktop online surveys. Take, for instance, geolocation capabilities which
allow for tailoring of surveys according to the respondent’s location. Or
in-store research, allowing customers to actually be in store making tradeoffs
and purchases to evaluate choices in the environment we try to replicate
online. Qualitative research can be enhanced with mobile devices, allowing
respondents to video their shopping experience and take images.
Similarly, smart eyewear has recently come into play within
the market research realm. Allowing for even more consumer behavior analysis,
this technology will play a large roll in qualitative research in the years to
come. Voice capabilities, eye-tracking, geolocation, you name it- these weapons
of market research will change the industry!
Both of these alternatives have been discovered and are
currently being explored for use. What options could 2015
bring? I believe the visual options have advanced far enough and we now must
turn to understanding consumer behavior from a psychological standpoint. How
can we measure what consumers really are thinking and understand this down to a
neurological level. How does this then interplay with rational vs. emotional
decision making models and how can we use this to influence consumers? Will the
next generation eyewear include on the fly brain scans? Will the smart watch measure
circulating neurotransmitters and predict choice behavior?
Changing times come with changing measures. To remain
relevant we must approach this development with open arms and continue to keep
looking forward
!
Janel Parker, Market
Research Consultant at SKIM, an international consultancy and marketing
research agency, has a background in Marketing and Psychology from Cornell
University. Her previous experience at a social media agency combined with her
knowledge from SKIM provide for a unique understanding of the relationships
between social media and marketing. She can be reached at
j.parker@skimgroup.com.

This Week In Market Research: 10/20/14 – 10/24/14

Hearables Will Trump Wearables: 3 reasons why they are better and even healthier

The 5 SEO Secrets Every Business Should Know


The Wearables Security Conundrum: Security concerns with the new Apple Watch

5 Tools for Creating Amazing Online Charts

7 Methods for Analyzing Your Great Idea Before You Bet The Company On it

Big Data and the Death of Passion: 4 Steps to help keep the passion

Wearable Tech to Hack Your Brain: A headset that shocks your brain and allows you to increase focus and energy

Big Data 2.0: Breaking down the next generation of big data

8 Big Trends in Big Data Analytics

Women in Data Science are Invisible: How to Change That via Wired

Big Data as the Boogeyman: How much information is to much?

About the Author:

Ryan Polachi is a contributing
writer concentrating his focus on Marketing, Finance and Innovation. He can be
reached at rpolachi@IIRUSA.com.

More from #TMRE14: Social Steganography – How Youth are Tricking Social Media Analytics

Danah Boyd
My biggest takeaway from the fascinating
keynote by social media and youth culture expert Danah Boyd, Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research and Founder of the Data &
Society Research Institute
, was that we need to be very careful about
analyzing social media, because apparently we misread a lot.
Boyd, an anthropologist and author of ‘It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens,’ noted that social media use
by young people has gone from a consolidation phase (Facebook) to a state of
complete fragmentation as young people dabble in a variety of platforms to meet
their needs.
As such, it’s no longer simple to optimize
analytics for social media because these platforms differ by structure, format
and, importantly, the use or purpose for which young people have deemed each
best suited, respectively.
Much of the migratory behavior we’re seeing in
young people on social media these days is a response to a lack of privacy and
the consequent desire to exert more control over what is shared with whom.
Boyd said young people care deeply about
privacy, but not in the sense we ‘grown-ups’ might think. She said they want to
be in public, not to be public, and they’re migrating from
platform to platform in an effort to exert control over their social situations.

Young people are increasingly speaking in a sort of code or ‘social steganography’
Boyd cautioned the audience to not to take
what’s posted online too literally, as young people are increasingly speaking
in a sort of code or ‘social steganography’: much of what they post is a
message hiding in plain sight intended for and whose meaning may only be
deciphered by select insiders.
‘My job as an ethnographer to get in deep and make sense of things has
gotten harder. We’re missing things.’
‘My job as an ethnographer to get in deep and make sense of things
has gotten harder,’ Boyd said. ‘We’re missing things.’
They’re also gaming algorithms in ways that
might throw you off. For example, Boyd said young people often insert brand
names randomly in status updates because they know that it will bump them to
the top of their friends’ lists.
‘Youth know Facebook and other platforms use
algorithms for commercial purposes,’ Boyd said.
They do the same thing with Gmail, she added,
whiting out text and pasting it into emails they send friends to trigger ads that are clearly targeted for other people for laughs, for example.
Boyd closed with a note about how young people are organizing by
networks instead of traditional groups.  ‘They get networks; they
understand how to flow things,’ she said.
The move from groups’characterized by established boundaries’to
networks, which are porous, constitutes a radical cultural shift, Boyd
emphasized.
The shift has implications for business culture, in particular. 
Boyd noted young people are voracious learners, which in part explains why
those who’ve entered the work force now switch jobs every couple of years. And
true to networking, they retain the ties they’ve made at their old jobs while
forging new ones, which may seem innocuous but may really not be.
Boyd noted that in Silicon Valley, for example, the new generation
of hi-tech industry workers doesn’t see a problem exchanging, say, code with
peers over coffee.
‘They’re fundamentally networked,’ Boyd explained.  ‘They see
no issue in meeting with friends from their old company and sharing information
that might be considered intellectual property.’

The transient nature of the emerging labor cohort and the free
flow and exchange of knowledge and experience inherent in the networked ethos
will completely change the culture of business, she concluded.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR 
Marc Dresner is IIR USA’s sr. editor and special communication
project lead. He is the former executive editor of Research
Business Report
, a confidential newsletter for the marketing
research and consumer insights industry. He may be reached at mdresner@iirusa.com. Follow him @mdrezz.

More from #TMRE14: An Inside Look at eBay’s Shopper Strategy

Gireesh Joshi

Gireesh Joshi, Director of Customer Insights at eBay, outlined the
process behind which research-based insights are used at eBay to identify and
help the company select from strategic options around ‘where to play’ and ‘how
to win,’ respectively.

Joshi took us behind the scenes of eBay’s dilemma of whether to
remain a pure Internet play or to become an omni-channel presence, possibly by
opening eBay brick-and-mortar stores, for example.
eBay has opted for neither and is instead pursuing an ‘Internet-enabled
commerce’ focus, fueled largely by research into the role mobile plays in
shopping.
Joshi reported 62% of shoppers use their mobile devices in the
store (‘showrooming’) and 63% of all purchase journeys begin online (‘bedrooming’).
‘We
used to think consumers alternated between two parallel worlds.’

‘We used to think consumers alternated between two parallel
worlds, but they don’t distinguish between online and offline. It’s all one
journey within which the Internet is pervasive,’ he said. 

Joshi pointed out that 90% of commerce still happens in the
physical store, despite the fact that shopping online is more convenient and
the same items sold online frequently cost less. 
Why? Because people don’t like to pay for shipping, as a matter of
principle, and they don’t like to delay purchase gratification. 
‘The starting point for shopping has moved from the
brick-and-mortar store to the computer or mobile device, but we end up at the
store,’ Joshi said, noting 52% of shoppers have now bought online and picked up
their purchase in the store.
eBay’s Click & Collect service capitalizes on this
growing trend.
The service
launched in the UK last year and has been so ‘amazingly successful’ that eBay
is planning a global rollout. 
Joshi also talked about the intriguing research eBay is conducting
around the discovery leg of the purchase funnel. (Nugget: eBay found the
discovery process for women shoppers differs from that of men.)
He noted manufacturers and retailers tend to focus on the
selection and fulfillment aspects of shopping today, while the critically
important process of discovery remains poorly understood by everyone, including
consumers, themselves
‘How does a consumer find what they want when they often don’t
know what it is they want’? Joshi explained.
This work’with some inspiration from Pinterest‘has led to eBay’s ‘Follow It. Find It‘ initiative to harness its 150 million users as ‘collection curators.’

Editor’s note: Gireesh Joshi was also featured in
TMRE’s Research Insighter interview series, in which he discussed how eBay
realized a NINE-FIGURE ROI on a predictive modeling-based approach that combined
behavioral data and survey research. Check it out here!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Marc Dresner is IIR USA’s sr. editor and special communication
project lead. He is the former executive editor of Research
Business Report
, a confidential newsletter for the marketing
research and consumer insights industry. He may be reached at mdresner@iirusa.com. Follow him @mdrezz.